Beijing bound

  • January 11, 2016
Beijing bound

Carlos Gonzalez Sierra selected as one of first Schwarzman Scholars.

China’s growing involvement in Latin America presents unprecedented opportunities and numerous challenges. For these relationships to flourish, regional leaders must not only strategically engage China, they must also be willing to learn from her. Participating in the Schwarzman Scholars Programmes will provide me with the knowledge of China, leadership training, mentorship and network to lead efforts to strengthen economic and diplomatic ties between China and the Dominican Republic.

Carlos Gonzalez Sierra

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has won a prestigious scholarship to study for a master's in China later this year.

Carlos Gonzalez Sierra [2015], who is doing a master's in Latin American Studies at the University of Cambridge, will be one of the first cohort of 111 Schwarzman Scholars at Tsinghua University in Beijing. 

Carlos, from the Dominican Republic, and two other Cambridge University students – Amos Wittenberg  and Leyla Sudbury – were selected from more than 3,000 applicants. The first class of Schwarzman Scholars is composed of students from 32 countries and 75 universities with 44% from the United States, 21% from China, and 35% from the rest of the world.  The class will both take classes and live at the newly constructed Schwarzman College on the Tsinghua campus. Expenses for each scholar are fully funded by the programme.

Carlos said: "China’s growing involvement in Latin America presents unprecedented opportunities and numerous challenges. For these relationships to flourish, regional leaders must not only strategically engage China, they must also be willing to learn from her. Participating in the Schwarzman Scholars Programmes will provide me with the knowledge of China, leadership training, mentorship and network to lead efforts to strengthen economic and diplomatic ties between China and the Dominican Republic. I look forward to a challenging year full of significant experiences, meaningful relationships and, most of all, personal and intellectual growth."

 “The calibre of this first class of Schwarzman Scholars is truly exceptional. Each Scholar has demonstrated tremendous leadership potential at a young age and differentiated themselves through a myriad of academic and non-academic pursuits,” said Stephen A. Schwarzman, the programme’s founder. 

 The 111 Scholars were selected through a process designed to evaluate proven intellectual and academic ability, as well as leadership potential, strength of character, ability to anticipate emerging trends, and desire to understand other cultures, perspectives and positions. 

The scholars, who will study Public Policy, Economics & Business, and International Studies, will live and study together at Schwarzman College, the dedicated state-of-the-art academic and residential building built exclusively for the programme.

Full details available here.

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