From meningitis to the regeneration of biliary tissue

  • March 8, 2016
From meningitis to the regeneration of biliary tissue

Three Gates Cambridge Scholars will speak at an Internal Symposium this week.

Three Gates Cambridge Scholars will be speaking about their research on meningitis, links between classical and current debates around sexual trauma and the regeneration of biliary tissue outside the liver at an internal symposium this Thursday.

Casey Rimland, Nikolas Oktaba and Laura Cooper will speak at the event on March 10th.

Casey will describe her research on progenitor cells in the human extrahepatic biliary tree and the gallbladder.  The extrahepatic biliary tree is responsible for the drainage and storage of bile and digestive juices produced by the liver and pancreas. Casey says diseases affecting the organ involve a failure to properly activate the regenerative response. However, despite their importance, she says little work has focused on the mechanisms involved in regeneration of biliary tissues outside the liver and that even less is known about what differences, if any, may exist between different regions of the biliary tree. Her research has sought to identify and characterise progenitor cells from the gallbladder, pancreatic duct and common bile duct.  She says: "These cells represent a promising model for studying biliary regeneration and have already led to an understanding of what signaling pathways may drive the proliferation of progenitor cells in the extrahepatic biliary tree."

Nikolas' talk, Cannabilism and rape, will focus on his close reading of the final scene in Nonnus' Dionysiaca, the story of Dionysus, god of wine and revelry and the longest surviving poem from Greco-Roman Antiquity. Nikloas says: "Recent studies of corporeality, BDSM practice and sexual trauma are germane to the analysis of the rape of Aura in Dionysiaca Book 48." Nikolas will speak about how Aura's experience in both her prophetic dream and in reality of being drugged, bound and raped, destabilises her and causes her to question her relationship to her body, her world and herself. He says: "Her subsequent killing spree and attempts at suicide are a means of public witness to her pain, a non-consensual witnessing that is crucial in recuperating some sense of corporeality and reclaiming her body to whatever extent she can. The act of cannibalism at the final stages of the poem is the culmination of these efforts."

In Laura's talk,  Exploring the potential for meningococcal serogroup replacement in the African Meningitis Belt, she will discuss  the impact of a vaccine against meningitis A in range of countries in Africa, from Senegal to Ethiopia. Although the vaccine has dramatically lowered the incidence of the disease, the incidence of other forms of meningitis has increased. Laura will talk about how she has created a mathematical model of transmission to demonstrate the importance of cross-protective immunity in determining the extent and rate of replacement of meningitis A with other forms of the disease . The model also  evaluates the impact of current and future vaccination regimes in a multi-strain system.

*The Internal Symposium will run from 7.30-9.30pm in the Gates Cambridge Scholars Common Room. Scholars and their guests are welcome. Picture credit of meningitis A vaccination programme: UN.

Latest News

Bridging the public health data gap

When Anwesha Lahiri  [2021] was doing her master’s fieldwork in India, she visited a tribal village in a remote area on top of a mountain between two districts. Only around 500 people lived there and there was no proper road leading to the village. At the heart of the problem was the dangerous ascent needed […]

Tracing the origins of our political beliefs

What makes some people more vulnerable to extremism than others? How do we build cognitive resilience against extreme ideologies? And how does the brain react to misinformation on social media? These are some of the key political questions that political neuroscientist Leor Zmigrod [2016] is exploring, putting the science into our understanding of radicalisation.   Leor […]

A leading woman in STEAM

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has been selected as one of the 75 leading women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics in India. Yama Dixit will feature in the second edition of the book She Is, published by the Red Dot Foundation in partnership with the Office of the Principal Scientific Adviser, Government of India to mark 75 […]

Tackling the obesity epidemic in Africa

When she left school, Paula-Peace James-Okoro [2022] intended to become a medical doctor, but after starting a degree in Biochemistry she discovered a passion for the subject and for using it to address one of the major health challenges facing Africa – obesity. She says: “In Africa, the rates of metabolic diseases, like obesity and […]