Gates alumna runs in Olympic trials

  • January 13, 2012
Gates alumna runs in Olympic trials

Amanda Scott competed in Houston Olympic trials on Saturday.

Gates alumna Amanda Scott took part in the he Olympic Marathon Trials in Houston at the weekend.

Amanda [2009] was one of around 150 of the 220 women to finish the trials. She said: “I felt an excruciating pain in my foot during the trials and I was so close to not finishing, but I knew I had people in Boulder, Virginia Beach, Tennessee, and England rooting for me.  It was all these people that kept me going.  Even though I jogged the last lap of the course I decided to take in all the sights and excitement so I could enjoy the experience.  Now I have an Olympic Marathon Trials Finishers Medal and I hope to have more of those in the future.”

Amanda, who has combined hours of training alongside her studies for many years, started running competitively at high school and did cross country as an undergraduate at Vanderbilt University.

In 2009 she started an MPhil in Advanced Chemical Engineering at the University of Cambridge and competed the London Marathon in 2010. Her MPhil focused on biofuel combustion and gasification.

She then moved to the University of Colorado at Boulder to do her PhD on solar thermal biomass processing and then took a break to work at Crocs working on performance and recovery shoes which allows her to combine her two passions of running and chemical engineering.

Fellow alumna Hilary Levey Friedman has profiled Amanda on the BlogHer site.

Picture credit: xedos4 and www.freedigitalphotos.net.

 

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