Gates Scholars win Lowry Prize in consecutive terms

  • April 29, 2009

An update on our most recent news story. Congratulations are now due to both Vijay Kanuru, who won the prestigious Lowry Prize in the Department of Chemistry in Michaelmas Term, and Rachel Pike, who has won it in Lent Term. The prize is awarded for the best graduate seminar in physical chemistry.

photo2 The prize is named after Thomas Martin Lowry, an English physical chemist born in 1874 near Bradford, West Yorkshire. In 1913 he became the first Professor of Chemistry in any London medical school – Guy’s Hospital Medical School. In 1920 he became the first holder of a chair of Physical Chemistry at Cambridge University, where he remained for the rest of his life. He studied changes in optical rotation caused by acid- and base-catalyzed reactions of camphor derivatives, which led to his formulation of the protonic definition of acids and bases in 1923, independently of the advocacy of the same concept by Johannes Nicolaus Brønsted in the same year.

Latest News

How to speak to young people about genocide

A Gates Cambridge Scholar is to present a very personal BBC Radio 4 series on how to educate young people about genocide and mass trauma next week. Alice Musabende [2016] will present Unspeakable, a five-part series which runs from 2-6 August* on BBC Radio 4 and BBC Sounds.  Alice is a former journalist from Rwanda, […]

The magic of music

Eighteen months ago, after finishing her PhD, Naomi Woo [2014] moved to Winnipeg to take up the role of assistant conductor of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra. The role is a first stepping stone to a career conducting orchestras in Canada and internationally. In this position, Naomi has conducted concerts for all audiences, but also had […]

Exploring the neural bases of consciousness

New insights into how neurochemical influences from the brainstem affect the rest of the brain to bring about consciousness could help brain-damaged patients and further our understanding of how consciousness works. A new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [PNAS] by researchers at the Division of Anaesthesia, University of Cambridge investigates the […]

Knowledge gap on zoonotic disease transmission highlighted

The impact of climate change on migration patterns, particularly in areas which depend on agriculture and livestock, could affect zoonotic disease transmission yet little research has been done to date. A new study, led by Gates Cambridge Scholar and Veterinary Science PhD student Dorien Braam [2018], looks at the research that currently exists, but calls […]