Scholar named emerging leader in dementia research

  • June 10, 2021
Scholar named emerging leader in dementia research

Dr Julie Qiaojin Lin is named an emerging leader in dementia research by the UK Dementia Research Institute

As an early career researcher, this programme is a fantastic opportunity for building up my independent research skills and extensive collaborations.

Dr Julie Qiaojin Lin

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has been recognised as an Emerging Leader in dementia research by the UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI).

Dr Julie Qiaojin Lin [2013] has been named one of 11 Emerging Leaders in the new initiative of the UK DRI. She is a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow in Professor Giovanna Mallucci’s Lab in the UK DRI at Cambridge University.

She joined the UK DRI in 2018 following her PhD training in Professor Christine Holt’s Lab at Cambridge as a Gates Cambridge Scholar, studying local protein synthesis in axons of healthy and disease-affected neurons. Her current research programme focuses on the dynamic localisation of RNA and proteins in neuronal compartments and how the localised molecules orchestrate synaptic structural and functional plasticity.

Using advanced imaging and multi-omics approaches, Dr Lin investigates early aberrant changes of local molecular organisation that ultimately lead to synapse loss and neurodegeneration.

Dr Lin says: I am deeply honoured for the recognition as a UK DRI Emerging Leader and to be part of the network formed by a group of talented young scientists working towards the same goal – fighting, preventing and eventually curing dementia.

“As an early career researcher, this programme is a fantastic opportunity for building up my independent research skills and extensive collaborations. My current research aims to understand how synapses, the connection and information relay sites between neurons, maintain their structure by receiving supports from surrounding molecules, how neurological disease progression might affect various activities occurring around synapses, and how we might be able to help neurons protect themselves by rescuing synapses with signs of declining health.”

Latest News

Rethinking feminist approaches to gender-based violence

Ilaria Michelis [2019] was completely surprised when, earlier this year, she was awarded this year’s Journal of Gender Studies Janet Blackman Prize. The Prize celebrates scholarship on international feminist movements and trade unions/women in work.  It was awarded for an article she published the year before in the Journal of Gender Studies based on an issue […]

Scholars scoop three social impact awards

Three Gates Cambridge Scholars have been recognised with awards from the Vice Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. The 15 Social Impact Awards in six categories were launched for the first time by Cambridge Hub in 2018-19, to celebrate students who have shown exceptional achievement in, and commitment to, creating positive social change. Since then, […]

Report highlights fatal health risk of climate change in Europe

Climate change is here, in Europe, and it kills. This is the warning of 69 contributors of the 2024 Europe report of the Lancet Countdown, published today in the Lancet Public Health and led by Gates Cambridge Scholar Kim Van Daalen [2018]. Tracking the links between climate change and health across the region, the new […]

Tracing the role of transposable elements in disease

What causes genetic disease? Rebecca Berrens’ research focuses on transposable elements or transposons, pieces of DNA formed as a result of ancient viruses that inserted into our genome. These can damage genes when they are active in the early stages of human development because they are able to move about the genome.  This can result […]