Scholars hold first internal symposium of the term

  • October 13, 2010
Scholars hold first internal symposium of the term

The Gates Scholars Council is holding the first internal symposium of the term.

The Gates Scholars Council is running its first Internal Symposium of Michaelmas term this week.

The symposium includes four presentations by scholars on their research.

Mathew Madhavacheril‘s talk “Mapping the Universe: The New Era of Precision Cosmology” will explain the enormous amount of information and observational evidence we get from the radiation left over from the Big Bang, and how the detection of this radiation transformed cosmology from speculative metaphysics to a precision science.

Mary Beth Day‘s talk, “Impact of Climate Change on Angkor, Cambodia” will focus on how her research is the first unequivocal demonstration that climate change had a direct impact on the hydraulic system at Angkor, capital of the Empire.

Douglas Brumley‘s presentation, “”The mathematics of swimming microorganisms (no mathematics required)” will provide an introduction to swimming microorganisms, and examine the physical principles involved in their locomotion.

Peter Brereton‘s talk, “Incredible semiconductor pimples: Quantum Dots”, will present some basics of self-assembled quantum dots, their properties, and their implications for future technologies.

The symposium starts at 6pm in the Gates Common Room.

Photo: J Frasse and www.freedigitalphotos.net

 

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