Distinguished Lecture Series: Mr Richard Mullender, Michaelmas 2009

  • September 25, 2009

The External Officers on the Gates Scholars’ Council are pleased to welcome the first speaker of the Michaelmas Term 2009 to Cambridge on October 13th.

Tuesday, 13 October 2009
“Just listen they’re scared: the application of hostage negotiation in everyday life”

Richard Mullender
Former member of the Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Unit, Scotland Yard
6:30pm, Location TBA

 

Richard Mullender retired from the Metropolitan Police after 30 years of service, specifically in the Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Unit of Scotland Yard, following both military service and work in the private sector. With skills in hostage negotiation honed from his police experience in a wide variety of operational roles and specialist detective duties, Richard has spent the last decade focusing on developing his training skills and has since been chosen to train law enforcement agencies (including at the Scotland Yard Crime Academy where he became a trainer in 1994; the FBI and the Scorpions in South Africa; the police forces of Brazil, the Philippines and Cyprus), as well as other government agencies in the UK and around the world, the United Nations, the Maltese Government (in preparation for the meeting of Commonwealth heads of government) and the Indian secret services.

He is still an “on call” hostage negotiator and has been involved in situations of national and international significance including the successful release of 3 UN workers held hostage in Afghanistan (2004) and the rescue of Norman Kember in Iraq (2005). He now runs a successful private training company delivering courses in the public and private sectors. Richard has designed & delivered bespoke courses for H.M. Immigration Service, Oracle, Sainsbury, Unilever, the Tate Gallery and a private security company involved in the protection of high-profile subjects. He is currently retained by the Metropolitan Police service to review and improve their advanced interviewing courses.

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