Distinguished Lecture Series: Rabbi Dr. Tvi Hersh Weinreb

  • May 11, 2009

Distinguished Lecture Series: Rabbi Dr. Tvi Hersh Weinreb

“Can a creation-based religion be consistent with science and evolution?”

Weinreb

A leading member of the Orthodox Union addresses whether a creation-based religion can be consistent with science and evolution at a lecture on 2nd February 2009. The talk at the Cambridge Union Society Debating Chamber by Rabbi Dr. Tzvi Hersh Weinreb, the executive vice president of the Orthodox Union, was arranged by the Gates Scholars’ Council and was open to the public.

Rabbi Weinreb, a clinical psychologist, has spoken of his views that the theory of evolution is consistent with the traditional Jewish view of the origin of the universe or the development of humanity. He has also stated that, although he finds Intelligent Design impressive, he believes the idea that the complexity of the universe is proof of the existence of a creator is a faith issue, rather than a science one, and, as such, should have no place in the curricula of public schools in the US because of the separation of the Church from the State. In religious schools he believes evolution should be taught in science and Intelligent Design should be taught in courses of Jewish thought.

Rabbi Weinreb is described as “one of the most extraordinary leaders in the American Jewish community today”. He was appointed to his current position in the Orthodox Union in January 2002. The OU is one of the oldest and largest Orthodox Jewish organisations in the United States and is best known for its role in certifying products as kosher. It also maintains a wide variety of religious, educational, social action and public policy programmes.

 

A recording of the lecture given on 2nd February is available at the following link: http://dl.getdropbox.com/u/594660/Rabbi%20Weinreb.WMA

The recording will available for streaming as an mp3 file shortly.

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