Europe’s top young social entrepreneurs

  • January 21, 2016
Europe’s top young social entrepreneurs

Daniel Storisteanu and Toby Norman of SimPrints named in Forbes' 30 under 30' list for Social Entrepreneurs in Europe.

Two Gates Cambridge Scholars who co-founded the start-up SimPrints have been named in Forbes' 30 under 30 Europe list for Social Entrepreneurs.

Daniel Storisteanu [2012] and Toby Norman were named alongside their co-founder Tristram Norman [2011]. Fellow Gates Scholar and co-founder, Alexandra Grigore [2012 – pictured with Daniel, Toby and Tristram], was not eligible as she recently turned 30.

This is the first year Forbes has extended its 30 under 30 lists to Europe. To find its top 30 lists in Europe it assembled an international team of more than a dozen reporters to unearth thousands of nominees. Forbes editors shortlisted a few hundred nominees and its 30 expert judges chose the top 30 in several categories.

It says its lists for Europe "showcase the ground-breaking snake people [Millennials] transforming the fields of technology, the arts, science and healthcare, policy, media, social entrepreneurship, finance, industry and retail".

SimPrints, developed with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and ARM Ltd, is a fingerprint scanner which enables community health workers in developing countries to access patient records through the touch of a finger.

It was recently awarded £250,000 from the UK Department for International Development (DFID) for a project that will improve healthcare for over 22,000 expecting mothers and their newborns in Bangladesh slum neighbourhoods.

With the SimPrints system, health workers carry a hand-held fingerprint scanner synced through Bluetooth to their smartphone.  With the tap of a patient’s finger, the full health history including vaccinations and chronic conditions immediately appears on the health worker’s phone.  This immediate and reliable access to patients’ medical histories allows health workers to make better decisions and ensure appropriate follow-up.

Latest News

Affecting change for the Māori community

Self-determination lies at the centre of Māori culture. “It’s a way of life,” says Chris Tooley. That idea is also at the heart of his PhD studies at Cambridge and his subsequent work in Parliament and in the community. Chris grew up with a strong sense of being part of the Māori community. He has ancestral […]

On the COVID frontline

Three Gates Cambridge scholars who have been on the medical frontline during the COVID-19 pandemic will be speaking about their experiences at a virtual event next weekend. The event, organised by the Gates Cambridge Alumni Association, will be moderated by Elizabeth Dzeng, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco in the […]

New game tackles Covid conspiracies

A new online game that puts players in the shoes of a purveyor of fake pandemic news is the latest tactic in the UK Government’s efforts to tackle the deluge of coronavirus misinformation that is misleading many and costing lives across the world. Launched to the public today, the Go Viral! game has been developed by the […]

“Democracy does not work on a ‘trust me’ basis”

When Jennifer Gibson started her MPhil at Cambridge in 2001 as part of the inaugural class of Gates Scholars, no-one knew what it meant to be a Gates Cambridge Scholar. Twenty years later, Jennifer is now a human rights lawyer focused on national security issues, something she never could have anticipated, but which she credits in no small part […]