Gates scholar to offer introduction to neuropsychological tests

  • October 25, 2010

Luning Sun will give a talk on neuropsychological tests which assess brain impairment.

Gates scholar Luning Sun will give a talk on Thursday on neuropsychological tests which measure how badly brain injury or psychiatric illness has affected the brain.

The talk, A brief introduction to neuropsychological tests, is part of the Cambridge Psychometrics Centre Seminar series and will take place on Thursday at 2-3pm in the Seminar Room of the Faculty of Politics, Psychology, Sociology and International Studies on the New Museums Site.

The administration of neuropsychological tests is a core part of neuropsychological assessment. Aspects of cognitive functioning that are assessed typically by the tests include memory, intelligence, language, visuoperception, attention, and executive-function.

Luning Sun is a Psychometric Neuropsychologist in the Psychometrics Centre at the University of Cambridge, and also a PhD student in the Department of Social and Developmental Psychology at the University. He graduated with a BSc in Psychology in the College of Science at Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China in 2008 with 1st Class honours.  During his time at Zhejiang he received an accolade of awards and prizes, including ‘Excellent Student Leader’, ‘Volunteer with Three Stars’, and ‘Excellent Social Practice’. He received the ‘Three Goods’  student award in 2005, 2006 and 2007.

In 2008 Luning began his career as a neuropsychologist, joining the Masters course in Neurocognitive Psychology at Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, München, Germany where he was awarded his degree in 2010 with high honours with a project on contextual learning in visual search. In 2007, Luning held a research internship in the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychophysiology at the Psychiatric Hospital of Munich, working on a project supervised by Professor Dr Engel to study the validity of a computerized interpretation of MMPI-2 profiles. In 2008 he continued as Professor Engel’s Research Assistant to perform a meta-analysis on neuropsychological test norms. In 2009 he continued his work in the hospital as Research Assistant to Professor Dr Hennig-Fast, carrying out a functional imaging study of Theory of Mind abilities in patients with schizophrenia.

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