Gates Scholar’s essay in New Scientist

  • July 8, 2010

Gates Scholar Corina Logan's prize-winning essay on social behaviour in corvids.

Gates Scholars Corina Logan recently won the New Scientist / Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour Science Writing Prize, for her essay on how corvids (birds in the crow family) support each other after stressful events. Her work is published this week in New Scientist.

She compares the behaviour of corvids after a dispute, when they tend to focus on their long-term partner and do not try to make up with their opponent, with that of many mammals, who feel the need to make up after fights in order to maintain their social networks.

Corina is working towards a PhD in Experimental Psychology, under the supervision of Professor Nicola Clayton.

Latest News

Scholar wins prestigious MLA award

Gates Cambridge Scholar Anna Kathryn Kendrick has won the 31st annual Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize for an outstanding book published in English or Spanish in the field of Latin American and Spanish literatures and cultures from the Modern Language Association of America. Anna [2011], who did her PhD in Spanish at the University of Cambridge […]

Scholars address sustainability at internal symposium

Five Gates Cambridge Scholars will take part in an internal symposium this week, discussing research on sustainability issues ranging from legal avenues to tackle the climate crisis to educational resilience. Each scholar will outline their research at the symposium on 1st December. They are: Jillian Sprenger [2021], who is doing an MPhil in Environmental Policy, […]

‘Heritage is not just about monuments’

Heritage studies tend to be based on Western models and case studies, with a lot of emphasis on monuments and tangible artefacts. “That’s quite a Western lens,” says Stanley Onyemechalu, who has just started his PhD at Cambridge. “I argue that Archaeology in a lot of the global north is obsessed with material things, but […]

New model developed for understanding biomolecular condensates

Our planet contains an outstandingly diverse population of species, from plants and animals, to microbes and viruses. Yet not all species are found everywhere, but rather, smaller subsets of them occupy different geographical regions, creating a wide-range of co-existing microenvironments that thrive under different climates and function in unique ways. The same can be said […]