Getting girls into STEM

  • February 3, 2016
Getting girls into STEM

Cassi Henderson is leading a local event to promote girls in STEM.

With this event we are hoping to offer an avenue through which to explore the fun side of science, and thereby encourage an interest in STEM among younger students who may not have previously considered it.

Cassi Henderson

Gates Cambridge Scholars are running a 'Promoting Girls in STEM' event in the local Cambridge community in March.

The event will involve girls aged five to 14 from a local group of USA Girl Scouts overseas and will be held on 12th March.

The event came about as part of the Gates Cambridge Community Service Committee and is led by Cassi Henderson [2015], who is doing a PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology. She was interested in an event encouraging young girls in STEM as she herself has benefited from some great mentors.

She says: "My mentors encouraged me into the field of engineering by providing me with examples of unique careers in science and with outlets to creatively explore through science. With this event we are hoping to offer an avenue through which to explore the fun side of science, and thereby encourage an interest in STEM among younger students who may not have previously considered it."

Cassi's PhD research investigates the fabrication of medical diagnostic tests through additive manufacturing and how this can be used to increase access to healthcare. She says defining a platform for linking chemistry needs with ease of manufacture "could ultimately enable affordable, rapid and point-of-care detection of diseases", ensuring patients get the correct care, especially in resource-limited settings.

Scholars interested in taking part in the event should sign up here.

*Picture credit of girls involved in an engineering camp in the US: Wikipedia.

 

Cassi Henderson

Cassi Henderson

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2015 PhD Chemical Engineering
  • Queens' College

With a background in biomedical engineering and product design, I am passionate about harnessing engineering advancements for the improvement of health. My research is focused on innovative solutions for the manufacture of affordable medical technology with an emphasis on local production in resource limited settings. In the future, I hope to continue to facilitate the transfer of the scientific developments in academic research into technology that increases accessibility to healthcare.

Previous Education

University of Pennsylvania
University of Cambridge

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