Getting girls into STEM

  • February 3, 2016
Getting girls into STEM

Cassi Henderson is leading a local event to promote girls in STEM.

With this event we are hoping to offer an avenue through which to explore the fun side of science, and thereby encourage an interest in STEM among younger students who may not have previously considered it.

Cassi Henderson

Gates Cambridge Scholars are running a 'Promoting Girls in STEM' event in the local Cambridge community in March.

The event will involve girls aged five to 14 from a local group of USA Girl Scouts overseas and will be held on 12th March.

The event came about as part of the Gates Cambridge Community Service Committee and is led by Cassi Henderson [2015], who is doing a PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology. She was interested in an event encouraging young girls in STEM as she herself has benefited from some great mentors.

She says: "My mentors encouraged me into the field of engineering by providing me with examples of unique careers in science and with outlets to creatively explore through science. With this event we are hoping to offer an avenue through which to explore the fun side of science, and thereby encourage an interest in STEM among younger students who may not have previously considered it."

Cassi's PhD research investigates the fabrication of medical diagnostic tests through additive manufacturing and how this can be used to increase access to healthcare. She says defining a platform for linking chemistry needs with ease of manufacture "could ultimately enable affordable, rapid and point-of-care detection of diseases", ensuring patients get the correct care, especially in resource-limited settings.

Scholars interested in taking part in the event should sign up here.

*Picture credit of girls involved in an engineering camp in the US: Wikipedia.

 

Cassi Henderson

Cassi Henderson

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2015 PhD Chemical Engineering
  • Queens' College

With a background in biomedical engineering and product design, I am passionate about harnessing engineering advancements for the improvement of health. My research is focused on innovative solutions for the manufacture of affordable medical technology with an emphasis on local production in resource limited settings. In the future, I hope to continue to facilitate the transfer of the scientific developments in academic research into technology that increases accessibility to healthcare.

Previous Education

University of Pennsylvania
University of Cambridge

Latest News

Bridging the public health data gap

When Anwesha Lahiri  [2021] was doing her master’s fieldwork in India, she visited a tribal village in a remote area on top of a mountain between two districts. Only around 500 people lived there and there was no proper road leading to the village. At the heart of the problem was the dangerous ascent needed […]

Tracing the origins of our political beliefs

What makes some people more vulnerable to extremism than others? How do we build cognitive resilience against extreme ideologies? And how does the brain react to misinformation on social media? These are some of the key political questions that political neuroscientist Leor Zmigrod [2016] is exploring, putting the science into our understanding of radicalisation.   Leor […]

A leading woman in STEAM

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has been selected as one of the 75 leading women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics in India. Yama Dixit will feature in the second edition of the book She Is, published by the Red Dot Foundation in partnership with the Office of the Principal Scientific Adviser, Government of India to mark 75 […]

Tackling the obesity epidemic in Africa

When she left school, Paula-Peace James-Okoro [2022] intended to become a medical doctor, but after starting a degree in Biochemistry she discovered a passion for the subject and for using it to address one of the major health challenges facing Africa – obesity. She says: “In Africa, the rates of metabolic diseases, like obesity and […]