Leading geoscience expert to speak on science advocacy

  • February 18, 2014
Leading geoscience expert to speak on science advocacy

Kasey White of the Geological Society of America will speak about the dialogue between scientists and policy makers at a Gates Cambridge event this Thursday.

A leading geoscience advocate who shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize will be speaking about the dialogue between scientists and policy makers at a Gates Cambridge event this Thursday.

As Director of Geoscience Policy, Kasey White leads the Geological Society of America’s advocacy efforts and provides scientific input into the policy process.

Prior to her work at the GSA, White served as Project Director in the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Office of Government Relations, where she focused on climate change and environmental issues, as well as the use of science in policymaking. She recently authored Working with Congress, a book to guide scientists in their policy involvement.

White formerly served as Director of Public Affairs for the Joint Oceanographic Institutions, where she led outreach efforts to the media, the general public, and Congress related to the Ocean Drilling Programme.

She worked with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as a co-editor of Climate Change 2001: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, and was the lead author of the technical summary of the report. For her efforts in this position, she received a share of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. White has also worked for the American Geological Institute’s Government Affairs Programme.

White has a B.A. in Environmental Science and Policy from Duke University and a masters in Environmental Sciences from The Johns Hopkins University.

She will be speaking via a webinar between 7 and 8pm on 20th February in the Gates Cambridge common room. Her presentation will draw on her numerous experiences in facilitating communication between scientists and policy makers, running briefings with Congress, and advocating for the GSA and other science organisations.

Picture credit: dan and www.freedigitalphotos.net.

 

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