Money vs mission

  • October 24, 2012
Money vs mission

A social enterprise company set up by Gates Cambridge Alumni has just published its first e-book giving advice to others seeking to build social enterprises that make money.

A social enterprise company aimed at making it easier for people with good ideas who are not well connected to get the ear of decision-makers has just published its first e-book giving advice to others seeking to build social enterprises that make money.

OneLeap [oneleap.com] was founded by Gates Cambridge alumni Hamish Forsyth and Robyn Scott and involves users, whatever their background, to send a 400-word message to anyone else on OneLeap – if they pay a fee. The fee, which shows the sender is serious and filters timewasters, goes to the recipient’s chosen charity. The message is guaranteed a response in 10 days or the fee is refunded.

It has just published its first e-book, How to Build a Social Enterprise that Makes Money, which brings together personal tips and stories from 14 of OneLeap’s successful social entrepreneur members.

The free e-book has garnered media interest and Hamish recently wrote an article for The Guardian giving tips on dealing with the dualism required of a social entrepreneur — to do good and make money.

Hamish [2007] says: “OneLeap published How to Build A Social Enterprise that Makes Money because financial sustainability in social enterprise needs attention. It’s a lot less sexy than the social outcomes, but no less important. A financially sustainable social enterprise not only serves more needs, more reliably, but it frees up scarce grant funding for unpopular but vital causes that will struggle to get traction in the market. The social entrepreneurs in the book deserve celebrating, and their advice is both inspiring and practical.”

Picture credit: suphakit73 and www.freedigitalphotos.net

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