Networking organisation reaches out to alumni

  • October 14, 2011
Networking organisation reaches out to alumni

Oneleap, cofounded by two Gates alumni, is opening up to the public on Monday.

A networking organisation co-founded by Gates alumni and designed to help bright young people get the ear of busy decision makers is opening up to the public from Monday.

Robyn Scott and Hamish Forsyth‘s organisation OneLeap featured in The Independent’s business section this week. It aims to make it easier for people with good ideas who are not well connected to get the ear of decision-makers.

From Monday anyone can join by importing their Linkedin profile. Hamish and Robyn are particularly keen to encourage Gates and Cambridge alumni to join.

Hamish says OneLeap has created a market for contacts that helps charity.  “We are the fast, credible way to get through fast to any professional or  contact – with a guaranteed reply.  At the same time, our contact market filters out the dross so busy people hear great ideas, but avoid timewasters,” he says. 

Among its members are Lord Stevenson, multi-millionare founders of US and UK tech companies such as Bebo and Xing,  captains of Industry such as the chairman of Monarch Group, leading global philanthropists, entrepreneurs and writers.

Hamish says: “Anyone who joins OneLeap can get directly through to anyone else on OneLeap – but only if they’re prepared to put down a deposit. The requirement to “put your money where your mouth is” makes for better thought-through messages, and eliminates time-wasters. Quite simply, it means that busy people can focus their attention on people who present mutual opportunities.  The recipient can either return the deposit for a good message, or send to to charity if not.  We take a small commission.”

OneLeap is one of the Nexters – the UK’s top 20 technology social enterprises – supported by the Prime Minister.

Picture credit: renjith krishnan and www.freedigitalphotos.net

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