Rethinking economic models for developing countries

  • May 31, 2016
Rethinking economic models for developing countries

Nadeem Ul Haque, lead author of Pakistan's Economic Growth Framework, will speak at an event this week.

The former Deputy Minister of Planning in Pakistan will talk about his leading role in creating the country's Economic Growth Framework at an event on Thursday.

Nadeem Ul Haque is lead author of the Framework. He is also former Vice Chancellor of Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, a former IMF Resident Country Representative for Egypt and Sri Lanka and spent over 24 years at the International Monetary Fund, including leading technical assistance missions and policy and research teams. As the IMF Representative for two central banks, he organised a modernisation strategy, which included improvements in the monetary framework and the policy formulation process. He has published five books and over 50 papers in major journals and edited volumes.

He will speak at the Rethinking Economic Development Models: Reflections on Pakistani Experience, organised by Gates Cambridge Scholar Arif Naveed [2014], on 2nd June. The event is  organised under the  Gates Cambridge Scholar-Initiated Support Fund.

The event will tackle the complex challenges faced by developing economies in devising economic policy. In his talk Nadeem Ul Haque will analyse the basic tenets of the framework and the process through which the policy was made. The aim is also to generate a wider discussion on development policy, the policy processes and the role of research in policy development.

It is a public event and of particular interest to those working on the issues of developing countries, and based at the departments of economics, development studies, public policy and other social sciences
and the centers of areas studies. The talk will be followed by refreshment.

Arif's research focuses on poverty, inequality, education and knowledge systems for policy making in Pakistan. His PhD explores the extent to which schooling enhances the intergenerational, social and economic
mobility in rural Pakistan.

*Rethinking Economic Development Models: Reflections on Pakistani Experience, 17:00 to 18:00, 2nd June [GSCR, University Centre]. For more information, please contact: man48@cam.ac.uk

Picture credit of children in Sindh province courtesy of Wikipedia.

Muhammad Arif Naveed

Muhammad Arif Naveed

  • Alumni
  • Pakistan
  • 2014 PhD Education
  • Jesus College

I grew up in an educationally disadvantaged village in South Punjab in Pakistan, witnessing various forms of inequality. With an aspiration to influence public policies on poverty reduction, I trained myself at the postgraduate level in the disciplines of economics, international development, and sociology of education. Over the last eight years, I have been engaged in policy research and contributed to the debates on the issues of poverty, inequality, education and knowledge systems for policy making in Pakistan. By re-conceptualising schooling and poverty from the perspective of the poor, my doctoral research examines if education is the best way out of poverty and towards social mobility. It explores the extent to which schooling enhances the social, economic and political participation of the poor in rural Pakistan. This interdisciplinary project is aimed at generating insights that will help reform education so that it plays a transformative role in the lives of the poor.

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