Scholar wins European Fellowship

  • January 22, 2016
Scholar wins European Fellowship

Derrick Roberts wins one of Europe's most competitive and prestigious awards to do postdoctoral research.

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has been awarded a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Actions research fellowship to pursue research on healing from chronic wounds.

Derrick Roberts has won one of Europe's most competitive and prestigious awards to undertake a postdoctoral position at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden from 2017.

He will be working with Professor Molly Stevens, one of the foremost biomedical engineers in the UK in the area of regenerative medicine. His project will centre on developing new dynamically-responsive hydrogels for accelerated healing in chronic wounds.

The Fellowship programme is named after the double Nobel Prize winning Polish-French scientist known for her work on radioactivity, and supports researchers at all stages of their careers, irrespective of nationality. It is aimed at fostering interdisciplinary research and international collaborations.

The MSCA research fellowship is the European Union funding programme with the broadest reach across the research community. There are opportunities at every career stage, from masters degree students to professors. The programme funds all disciplines and has a strong track record of industry participation.

Derrick [2012] is completing a PhD in Chemistry focused on self-assembled molecular containers and their uses in nanotechnology. During his time at Cambridge, he has published several papers in peer review journals and won second place in the 2015 Association of British Turkish Academics Doctoral Researcher Awards.

As part of his PhD research programme, Derrick has been taking part in a £500K EPSRC-funded project to investigate synthetic protein-like molecules for better understanding cystic fibrosis, and potentially develop a treatment regime for this devastating disease.

Latest News

Towards a dictionary of the human genome

Marie Brunet’s research focuses on the secrets still hidden in our genomes. She says that despite the fact that we live in an era where getting our genome sequenced is possible, we still don’t know the origin of two fifths of inherited diseases. That is because, as she says, the genome only currently maps the […]

Scholar recognised for research into misinformation

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has been shortlisted for a Women of the Future Award for her research into countering misinformation. Melisa Basol [2018] was shortlisted for the science category of the UK Awards which recognises “truly remarkable female scientists, forging new ground in research and scientific achievement”. There are 11 other categories and three special […]

Scholars join forces on anti-cancer drug

Two Gates Cambridge Scholars have joined forces to work on a drug candidate that has the potential to replace one of the most widely used cancer drugs around the world. Dr Anand Jeyasekharan [2004], who did his PhD in Oncology, and Dr Chandler Robinson [2009] who did an MBA at Cambridge, will collaborate on a […]

Making the experiences of imprisoned women activists visible

Growing up in a small town in Bengal, Jigisha Bhattacharya [2022] developed a particular sensitivity to marginalised groups and conflicts between different communities and identities from an early age.  It is this interest and her experience of political protests at university, combined with a longstanding curiosity about the links between politics and the arts, that […]