Scholar wins history of education prize

  • April 23, 2021
Scholar wins history of education prize

Anna Kathryn Kendrick has won the prestigious ISCHE prize for her book based on her PhD research

As an award given for a first book, ISCHE also seeks to recognise a historian of education of extraordinary capability and promise.

International Standing Conference for the History of Education

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has won a prestigious history of education award for her book on the origins and influence of the education reformers in early 20th Spain.

Anna Kathryn Kendrick won the International Standing Conference for the History of Education’s First Book Award for her book, Humanizing Childhood in Early Twentieth-Century Spain.

It traces how Spanish neo-humanist education reformers drew upon international models to advance ‘catholic’ notions of holism and universality.  The book is based on Anna’s PhD in Spanish which she completed at the University of Cambridge.

In the study Anna [2011], now Clinical Assistant Professor of Literature and Director of Global Awards at NYU Shanghai, demonstrates that the fight for an education in mind, body and spirit had not only intellectual but also practical consequences which were to shape an entire generation before the Spanish Civil War.

The ISCHE award recognises a single-authored academic monograph by a historian of education that represents innovative and exemplary scholarship in the field of history of education broadly conceived.

The ISCHE says: “As an award given for a first book, ISCHE also seeks to recognise a historian of education of extraordinary capability and promise.”

The award is presented every year at the General Assembly meeting during the annual conference. Any book copyrighted during the current year or the year before is eligible for consideration. Books published in any of the five ISCHE languages (English, French, German, Portuguese and Spanish) are considered.

The books are evaluated by an international committee of experts on criteria including excellence and thoroughness of historical research, innovative and rigorous thinking, use of original and primary materials, innovative use of sources, integration of sub-disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives, exemplary writing and clarity of expression and value in furthering the understanding and history of education; impact on the field of history of education.

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