Weekend of Research promises fascinating exchange of knowledge

  • May 11, 2020
Weekend of Research promises fascinating exchange of knowledge

Picture credit: Pembroke College Library and Roger 888 courtesy of Wikimedia commons.

This year's Weekend of Research will be online and feature scholars and alumni in discussions, workshops and presentations about their research.

Gates Cambridge Scholars and Alumni will be sharing their research knowledge on subjects ranging from dementia and global health to conservation in presentations, panel discussions and lightning talks at this year’s – online – Weekend of Research beginning on 15th May.

The weekend includes keynote speaker Tom Rivett-Carnac, co-founder of Global Optimism, an organisation which describes itself as a movement of  “stubborn climate optimists”,  in conversation with Reetika Subramanian [2019], who is doing a PhD in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies.

There will be a range of panel discussions, including one on COVID-19 with Saloni Atal [2017], Ria Roy [2017], Reetika Subramanian, Vaithish Velazhahan [2018] and Mutum Yaikhomba [2017].

Another is on the ethical challenges for conservation with Onon Bayasgalan [2019], Emiliano Cabrera Rocha [2019], Charles Emogor [2019], Anna Guasco [2019] and Valentine Reiss-Woolever [2019]. The panel will discuss a range of ethical issues from physical and economic displacement of local people to militarised violence in conservation programmes and from privacy concerns about surveillance technology to welfare concerns for both target and non-target wildlife.

The Weekend features a Gates Cambridge Alumni Association Online Global Health Meeting which includes panels on the role of the pharmaceutical industry in ensuring access to medicine [with Alex Kong (2016), a researcher at the Access to Medicine Foundation, Victor Roy (2009),  a resident at Boston Medical Center and Research Fellow at the UCL Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose, and Rebekah Scheuerle (2013) Vaccines Value Strategy Manager at GSK]; tackling the COVID-19 pandemic [with Salma Daoudi (2018), a Junior Researcher for the Policy Center for the New South, Emily Jordan (2009), Chief Operations Officer of Intrepid Analytics and Stephen Kissler (2014), Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health]; and  health innovation and sustainable patient care in low- and middle-income countries [with Sabrina Anjara (2014), Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University College Dublin, Isaac Holeman (2013), Clinical Assistant Professor of Global Health at the University of Washington and Co-Founder and Research Lead of Medic Mobile and Paulo Savaget (2015), Assistant Professor at Durham Business School, Researcher at the Skoll Centre at the University of Oxford and a sustainability hacking expert.

In addition to panel discussions, the Weekend also includes a series of jargon-free lightning talks and presentations, including:

– Eddie Cano Gomez [2017] on studying the spectrum of human T cells one cell at a time. He will describe a study using single-cell RNA-sequencing to study how naïve and memory T cells respond to infection and develop immune memory. It also shows how the cells adapt to their environment, but that this potential is lower in the more experienced memory T cells. “Our study highlights the complexity of T cells and their potential to adapt to changing environments within the body,” says Eddie.

– and Anna Malaika Nti-Asare-Tubbs [2017] on her project exploring the lives of Alberta King, Louise Little, and Berdis Baldwin, the mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin respectively.  She says: “My biographic project carefully finds evidence of, and pieces together, three unique life stories in order to contribute to historical, sociological, and political conversations concerning Black motherhood in the US.”

Reetika Subramanian

Reetika Subramanian

  • Scholar
  • India
  • 2019 PhD Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies
  • Queens' College

Early marriage and bridal trafficking in Rajasthan, sexual violence in Mumbai, female circumcision among Dawoodi Bohras: my experiences as a journalist and researcher have exposed me to diverse geographies, socio-economic realities and cultural prejudices that young women across India face. Home, however, is the place where I first found my bearings. As a survivor of domestic violence, my feminism got defined by my mother's everyday negotiations within the structures that cultivate and normalise the culture of silence. It drove me to challenge patriarchal notions of leadership and become sensitive to differences. Gender became a way of seeing the world. Backed by my rich field insights, multimedia skills and a feminist consciousness, I am excited to return to Cambridge to pursue my PhD as a Gates Cambridge scholar. My study straddles the areas of climate justice and gender equality. In India's historically drought-prone and caste-ridden Marathwada region, I seek to combine a multi-sited feminist ethnography with an informed interpretation of oral folk poetry, to understand the historical compulsions, lived experiences and gendered labour burdens of Dalit and Adivasi girls in a climate crisis. My fundamental interest in pursuing the project stems from my yearning to reconcile collaborative storytelling with pressing marginalised realities.

Previous Education

University of Cambridge Multi-disciplinary Gender Stud 2017
Tata Institute of Social Sciences Media and Cultural Studies 2015

Saloni Atal

Saloni Atal

  • Scholar
  • India
  • 2017 PhD Psychology
  • Christ's College

I am a social psychologist and I study and mobilise around drivers for gender equality and sustainable development. My doctoral research at the Cambridge Institute of Public Health aims to use theoretical perspectives from social psychology to evaluate the impact of an innovative NGO-run community education programme in Mumbai (https://www.muktanganedu.org/) on the empowerment of women.

Through my research, I aim to produce policy relevant insights into women's empowerment and well-being in low-income settings. Prior to my PhD, I completed the MPhil in Social and Development Psychology at Cambridge (2015-16), as part of which I examined perceptions of mental illness among slum-dwelling Indian women and how these relate to their sociocultural context. My findings have been published in Transcultural Psychiatry: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1363461520947836

I am immensely thankful to the Trust for their support, without which I would not have been a part of this rich heritage. I had many mentors on my way to this scholarship and I am passionate about paying it forward. If you're considering applying and have questions, don't hesitate to get in touch with me (saloniatal@hotmail.com). If you're interested in my work you can follow me on Twitter: Saloni_Atal

Previous Education

University of Hong Kong
University of Cambridge

Ria Roy

Ria Roy

  • Scholar
  • Korea, Republic of
  • 2017 PhD Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
  • Selwyn College

I was born of an Indian father and a Korean mother in Seoul, Korea. I grew up in Korea speaking three languages -- Korean, English and Bengali -- and frequently visiting India. This experience exposed me to strikingly different cultures and styles of thought, but it also meant that, although I was a native Korean speaker imbued with Korean culture, I was able to look at my society as an outsider, making me sensitive to the role that representations of national identity play in politics. I then pursued my undergraduate studies at the School of International Liberal Studies, Waseda University, Japan. During this time, I not only learned Japanese, but also developed an academic interest in studying representations, North Korea, and East Asian history. I then studied for my MA at Harvard University (Regional Studies – East Asia), where I examined the interaction of aesthetics, politics, language and literature in North Korea, focusing on the funeral of the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-il. In my PhD at the University of Cambridge, I am eager to delve deeper into the question of the manufacture of charisma in North Korea and to trace its transformation from a state committed to Marxist-Leninist views to one that propagates a semi-mystical view of leadership. As a Gates Cambridge Scholar, I hope to put my work on political representations in North Korea and Asia into a broader context and so to help provide knowledge that could be used for the benefit of people everywhere.

Previous Education

Waseda University
Harvard University

Mutum Yaikhomba

Mutum Yaikhomba

  • Scholar
  • India
  • 2017 PhD Biological Science at the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit
  • St John's College

I come from the outskirts of Imphal in Manipur, located in the foothills of the eastern Himalayas. Though serene, it has been a zone of armed conflict for the past 60 years. To escape this, my mother sent me to South India to study and explore the other side of the world. Thus, a constant nostalgia, as well as something to do for my home state, lingers intermittently in my thoughts. I then joined IISER Pune after my high school. Alongside exploring world-class science through conferences, seminars and the labs here, I could meet many outstanding scientists around the globe. Most importantly, I value the freedom and environment IISER Pune has given me - to imagine, think, question, learn and discuss - a relief from my school times. Here, I have worked on the biology of a chemoreceptor regulating bacterial motility. I will be soon moving to Cambridge to understand the mechanism of active proton transport in Complex I, an enzyme involved in making energy rich ATP molecules. Its dysfunction causes neuromuscular diseases like the Leigh’s syndrome. Alongside making fundamental discoveries in science and discussing it, I am keen on meeting the Gates Cambridge community to discuss how peace and sustainable development, considering all species around, can be initiated in an economically weak region, without compromising the values, culture and livelihood of the local people. I’m also very excited to explore arts and humanities with the GC club, for which I couldn’t get a chance so far.

Previous Education

Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune

Onon Bayasgalan

Onon Bayasgalan

  • Scholar
  • Mongolia
  • 2019 MPhil Conservation Leadership
  • Newnham College

I was born in Mongolia, a country that is the most sparsely populated and has the coldest capital in the world. I studied Environmental Economics and later Environmental Policy at Whitman College and Yale University, respectively. During my years of study, I was fascinated by how the valuation of environmental services can be used as a powerful tool to influence policies. More recently, I managed a market-based conservation project called the Sustainable Cashmere Project while at the Wildlife Conservation Society Mongolia program. As an MPhil in Conservation Leadership candidate, I am very interested in further exploring ways to incorporate sustainable practices and standards into supply chains. I believe that forging strong relations with committed industries is one of the key solutions to expanding the impact and influence of conservation principles around the world. I am also passionate about further supporting young environmentalists, which will build on the Environmental Fellowship Program that I initiated while working for the Zorig Foundation. I hope to see Mongolian conservationists play a more critical leadership role nationally by pushing to incorporate climate change sensitive policies, and globally by increasing our collaboration with other countries. As a Gates Cambridge Scholar, I am very excited to be a part of a dynamic network of bright minds around the world that can cross-fertilize a rich array of ideas and experiences on innovative and pressing topics.

Previous Education

Yale University Environmental Policy 2013
Whitman College Environmental Economics 2009

Emiliano Cabrera Rocha

Emiliano Cabrera Rocha

  • Alumni, Scholar-elect
  • Bolivia, Mexico
  • 2019 MPhil Latin-American Studies
    2020 PhD Geography
  • Hughes Hall

Growing up during the rapid development in Bolivia in the 90's, I witnessed the construction of many new roads and other infrastructure projects. I was struck to see how the benefits and burdens of these new projects were distributed differentially across the population. These observations sparked my interest in the politics of the built environment. I moved to Mexico to pursue a BA in industrial design, a training that left me well attuned to the effects that material cultures have upon our everyday lives. At Cambridge, I will research how different human communities assemble themselves with non-human actors to gain political agency. I will focus on the current mobilizations around the construction of a highway slated to cut through the Territorio Indígena Parque Nacional Isiboro-Sécure (TIPNIS) in the Bolivian Amazon. I am interested in understanding how the highway infrastructure of the TIPNIS project enables (and disables) specific discourses and modes of mobilization. Underlying my academic research is a commitment to assembling knowledges that will equip a wider array of citizens to participate more fully and democratically in the politics that surround infrastructural development. In parallel with my research, I am currentl

Previous Education

University of Cambridge Latin American Studies 2020
Tec de Monterrey (ITESM CEM) Industrial Design 2012

Charles (Carl) Emogor

Charles (Carl) Emogor

  • Scholar
  • Nigeria
  • 2019 PhD Zoology
  • St Edmund's College

I have always been fascinated by wildlife and wild places since my childhood. Growing up in a rural community in Nigeria, I had the first-hand opportunity to interact with nature. Unfortunately, during my early teenage years, these places were fast disappearing, including the wild animals that lived in them. This was my motivation to study Forestry and Wildlife Management for my bachelor’s degree. After my degree in Nigeria, I completed the Durrell Endangered Species Management Graduate Certificate at the Durrell Wildlife Academy in Jersey, United Kingdom (validated by the University of Kent), and an MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation and Management at the University of Oxford. Focused on Cross River gorilla conservation in the Cross River rainforest, I worked for the Wildlife Conservation Society, Nigeria for about two years prior to my MSc.

During my Ph.D. in Zoology, I seek to understand the population dynamics and ecology of three pangolin species in Nigeria. My research also aims to understand the role Nigeria plays in the trade of pangolins which are currently the most illegally traded mammals. This study will shed important new light on the drivers and characteristics of the trade in pangolins in Nigeria which will be useful in implementing behavioural change interventions and enforcement actions against the trade.

Previous Education

University of Oxford Biodiversity, Conservation/Mgt 2019
The University of Kent Durrell Endangered Species Mgt 2018
Cross River University of Tech Forestry and Wildlife Mgt 2016

Anna Guasco

Anna Guasco

  • Scholar
  • United States
  • 2019 PhD Geography
  • Downing College

While studying at Carleton College in Minnesota and working as a park ranger at my local national park in coastal California, I found myself drawn to the unexpected connections between storytelling, history, environment, and justice. I centred my undergraduate and postgraduate research around these interdisciplinary interests, obtaining a B.A. in American Studies at Carleton and an M.Sc. in Environment, Culture and Society as an Avangrid Scholar at the University of Edinburgh. In my doctoral research in Geography at the University of Cambridge, I will study geographies, histories, and narratives of grey whale migration and conservation along the North American Pacific Coast. Through this work, I aim to examine how stories affect perceptions of historical encounters and outcomes of contemporary encounters, and to assess how storytelling interacts with issues of justice. In addition, I am passionate about public engagement, access, and accessibility. My interest in public engagement and access has been shaped by professional, academic, and service experiences, including volunteering as an environmental educator and education consultant, organizing Carleton’s first ‘BioBlitz’, serving as a resident assistant and public scholarship fellow at Carleton, supporting a local city council member’s environmental justice advocacy, and conducting independent research on environmental history, ethics, and aesthetics with Channel Islands National Park. As a Gates Cambridge Scholar, I hope to collaborate with other Scholars and Cambridge community members to promote equitable access to research, education, and storytelling.

Previous Education

University of Edinburgh Master of Science Environment, Culture & Society 2017
Carleton College Bachelor of Arts American Studies 2016

Valentine Reiss-Woolever

Valentine Reiss-Woolever

  • Scholar
  • United States
  • 2019 PhD Zoology
  • St Edmund's College

As a native of Arizona’s biodiverse Sonoran desert, my appreciation for the environment was inevitable. After moving to Germany for secondary school, I studied Zoology at University College Cork in Ireland, including an exchange at National University of Singapore. For the past two years, I have been working across Latin America in community-based conservation. Experiencing the conflicts plaguing tropical forests provoked my desire to solve a critical problem: while demand for agricultural land threatens biodiversity, production is essential to livelihoods. With Dr. Edgar Turner, I will focus on conservation and income stability in smallholder oil palm plantations, evaluating management methods’ effects on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and profit. The research aims to improve understanding of oil palm ecology, smallholder economic relations, and other core ecological and sociological principles. With educated management, I believe biodiversity conservation has potential to ameliorate poverty and foster improvement for a range of pressing concerns. I am truly honoured to be part of The Gates Cambridge Trust, which provides an unparalleled foundation and community for positive global change.

Previous Education

University College Cork Bachelors of Science in Zoology 2017

Alex Kong

Alex Kong

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2016 MPhil Biological Science (Pharmacology)
  • Churchill College

Being a Gates Scholar has been one of the defining moments of my life so far, and I am delighted to have the opportunity to remain engaged as Co-Chair of the Gates Cambridge Alumni Association. After earning my MPhil in Pharmacology, I completed my PharmD at the University of Kansas and made a critical decision to switch fields from the pharmaceutical sciences to global health. For two years, I worked at the Access to Medicine Foundation, a global health non-profit based in Amsterdam that assesses the policies, commitments, and actions of some of the largest global pharmaceutical companies in ensuring access to medicine for patients in low- and middle-income countries. My role as the R&D lead on the Access to Medicine Index involved dissecting the pipelines of 20 pharmaceutical companies and challenging companies to ensure that these projects were available as quickly and broadly as possible through systematic and advance access planning during clinical development. This fall, I will begin a PhD program in International Health at Johns Hopkins University with the goal of advancing access to medicine issues related to innovation and honoring the Gates Cambridge commitment to improve the lives of others.

Previous Education

University of Kansas

Links

https://www.linkedin.com/in/alex-kong-4415b76b

Victor Roy

Victor Roy

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2009 MPhil Modern Society and Global Transformations
    2012 PhD Sociology
  • King's College
Rebekah Scheuerle

Rebekah Scheuerle

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2013 PhD Chemical Engineering
  • St John's College

I am so honored to be pursuing my PhD in chemical engineering at Cambridge! I will be studying biopharmaceutical development and drug delivery in the lab of Dr. Nigel Slater. Although therapeutic development is necessary globally, the world is in desperate need of affordable, optimized therapies and diagnostics for resource-limited environments. Millions of people do not have access to the electricity and refrigeration required for many current medical treatments. I hope to use my experience in polymeric drug delivery from The University of Texas, microfluidic diagnostics from U.C. Berkeley, vaccine commercialization from Merck Sharp and Dohme, and antibody purification development from Genentech to support me in my graduate studies. I plan on using the skills I acquire at Cambridge in a future career developing biotechnology-based solutions to world health problems.

Salma Daoudi

Salma Daoudi

  • Alumni
  • Morocco
  • 2018 MPhil International Relations and Politics
  • Lucy Cavendish College

Born and raised in Morocco, I developed early on an interest for politics and international relations, especially as the Arab spring unfold in neighbouring countries. In order to gain a deeper understanding of how development issues can threaten regional and global security, I majored in International Studies at Al Akhawayn University to study and research the development-security nexus. After a semester spent at Binghamton University and an internship at the Moroccan Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, I particularly developed interest for biopolitics and the interrelation between health and security, which has been the main focus of my undergraduate capstone research. During the course of my Mphil in International Relations and Politics at the University of Cambridge, I seek to further deepen our understanding of how failing to provide for the right to health in complex civil war humanitarian emergencies in the MENA region constitutes an emerging security threat. I want my academic research to embody my engagement towards global development and equity, which I have developed while serving the social missions of clubs such as Rotaract and volunteering to tutor refugee children in Morocco. Besides, I also enjoy reading, traveling, and writing fiction. I am honoured to join the Gates Cambridge community, and look forward engaging in an as stimulating as inspirational journey towards improving others’ lives.

Previous Education

SUNY Binghamton
Al Akhawayn University

Emily Rose Jordan

Emily Rose Jordan

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2009 PhD Experimental Psychology
  • Corpus Christi College
Stephen Kissler

Stephen Kissler

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2014 PhD Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics
  • King's College

Born and raised at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in Castle Rock, Colorado, I completed my Master's degree in Applied Mathematics just a few miles north at the University of Colorado Boulder in 2014. At Cambridge, my PhD research will involve mathematically modelling influenza epidemics, in order to better understand the disease's transmission and to predict which control measures (such as vaccination, travel advisories, and school closures) will most effectively slow or stop an outbreak. I hope that this will ultimately lead to a career in mathematical epidemiology, emphasizing in preventing emerging infectious diseases that cross over from animal to human hosts. In addition to research, I also love to teach mathematics, and I hope to find ways to do so during my time at Cambridge and over the course of my career.

Sabrina Gabrielle Anjara

Sabrina Gabrielle Anjara

  • Alumni
  • Indonesia
  • 2014 PhD Public Health and Primary Care
  • Queens' College

Sabrina recently completed her PhD as the first Gates Cambridge Scholar from Indonesia. Her thesis focused on the implementation and outcome evaluation of mental health care policies in Indonesia, specifically in adapting service delivery models to local contexts. She is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University College Dublin, working on the implementation of Collective Leadership in the Ireland East Hospital Group.

Sabrina holds a BA in Psychology and Asian Studies from the University of Melbourne, and an MSc in Organisational Psychiatry and Psychology from King’s College London. Prior to Cambridge, Sabrina worked at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and at the Ministry of Social and Family Development, Singapore. She’s a World Economic Forum Global Shaper.

Isaac Holeman

Isaac Holeman

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2013 PhD Management Studies
  • King's College

Isaac Holeman is a designer-researcher striving for global health equity. As a social scientist and co-founder of the social enterprise Medic Mobile, his work is about seeing complex health systems from the perspective of the poor and marginalized and responding pragmatically. Medic Mobile received a Skoll award in 2014, and Isaac has been featured twice in Forbes Magazine as one of the top 30 social entrepreneurs under the age of 30. He is an active speaker and consultant, and his writing has been featured in outlets such as National Geographic, the Oregonian and the Harvard Global Health Review. He continues to practice design at Medic Mobile, while pursuing research projects as a fellow of the University of Edinburgh’s Global Health Academy and as a Gates Cambridge Scholar in innovation, strategy and organization.

Paulo Savaget Nascimento

Paulo Savaget Nascimento

  • Alumni
  • Brazil
  • 2015 PhD Engineering
  • Hughes Hall

Paulo Savaget recently completed a PhD at the University of Cambridge as a Gates Scholar. His research lies at the intersection of sustainability, system change, and innovation management - and is particularly focused on finding innovative solutions in situations where information is limited, resources are scarce, time is short, stakes are high, and decision-making is urgent. His PhD formulated the concept of Sustainability Hacking and can be accessed through the link below:
https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293443

Paulo has over 10 years of professional experience, working either as a lecturer, consultant, entrepreneur, or researcher committed to finding innovative solutions towards a more socially inclusive and environmentally resilient world. As an entrepreneur, Paulo co-founded an award-winning start-up, which received approximately USD100,000 from a Brazilian innovation grant to develop an LED solution for public lighting. As a consultant, he worked on multiple projects, including for an intergovernmental organisation (i.e., OECD), several large companies of different sectors in Latin America, non-profits, and government agencies. He has taught several courses at Fundação Dom Cabral, the best business school in Latin America, where he is now a Visiting Lecturer; tutored at the Judge Business School, University of Cambridge; and has been committed and actively engaged with social entrepreneurship in Latin America and Africa.

He has been granted the IBM Business of Government Award, the Green Talents Award from the German Ministry of Science and Technology, and the Oldham Award from the University of Sussex, and has received multiple scholarships for his studies, such as from the Gates Trust, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and the Brazilian Council for Science and Technology.

His publications can be found through the link below:
https://bit.ly/2XdEbn2

Previous Education

University of Sussex
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro

Eddie Cano Gamez

Eddie Cano Gamez

  • Alumni, Scholar
  • Mexico
  • 2016 MPhil Biological Science (Sanger)
    2017 PhD Biological Science at the Sanger Institute
  • Selwyn College

From my childhood, I remember the smell of books. The shelves full of novels at my grandmother’s house, the aroma of old pages in the reading room of my primary school during winter. I like to think of my life as a series of libraries. From the surreal verticality of Biblioteca Vasoncelos, with its whale skeleton hanging from the roof, to the Maori carvings of Auckland University Library. When I think of it that way, perhaps it is not surprising that, after pursuing a degree in biotechnology in Mexico City, I ended up studying immunogenomics. Picture, for instance, Alice through the looking glass. “Here it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place”, said the Red Queen. When I read this quote, I think of the immune system. How fast must it run to keep our place in a world ruled by microbes? But the immune system does not run, it plans ahead and divides tasks. It is a community of cells that talk to each other. During my PhD in at The Sanger Institute, Cambridge I will study the immune system, using transcriptomics to link gene expression and cellular functions to genetic variation across individuals. Because I firmly believe in the transforming power of knowledge, when out of the lab I like teaching, and promoting art and science. Languages and music are my biggest passions. Monet, my favourite painter. And my dearest dream, to someday have a positive impact in Latin American society. As a Nahuatl poet once put it, “all that is true has a root”. And, to me, the desire to improve our world will always be the root from which everything else stems.

Previous Education

University of Auckland
University of Cambridge

Anna Malaika Ntiriwah Asare

Anna Malaika Ntiriwah Asare

  • Scholar
  • United States
  • 2017 PhD Sociology
  • King's College

Spending the first half of my life traveling from country to country including Dubai, Estonia, Mexico, Sweden, and Azerbaijan, among others, fostered a deep appreciation in me for the tremendous diversity of the world. However, in every place I noticed the ways in which narratives differed based on the perspective of the storyteller and how the national narrative depended on those with the most power. Studying Medical Anthropology, and Multidisciplinary Gender Studies in my BA and MPhil programs respectively, in addition to spending my last two years teaching Ethnic Studies to high school students in Stockton, CA, have been a part of my mission to elevate the status of marginalized narratives. As a PhD student in Education at Cambridge, I will focus on the role education has played in suppressing Black women’s narratives and how Black women have still thrived in academic spaces despite this challenge. As a Gates scholar I will use this knowledge to facilitate more inclusive learning environments and curricula.

Previous Education

Stanford University
University of Cambridge

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