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Shahzad Ansari

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2001 PhD Management Studies
  • St Edmund's College
Shahzad Ansari

Shahzad Ansari

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2001 PhD Management Studies
  • St Edmund's College

Prof Shaz Ansari is a Professor of Strategy at Judge Business School, University of Cambridge and Visiting Faculty at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University. He holds a PhD from University of Cambridge. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Academy of Management Review, Organization Science, Journal of Management Studies and Organization Studies, and is a member of Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM). His research interests include institutional processes and diffusion of practices; social movements, social and environmental issues in management, technological and management innovations; reputation management, and bottom-of-the-pyramid strategies. He has published in several leading academic journals including Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Strategic Management Journal, Organization Science, Journal of Management Studies, Research Policy, Industrial and Corporate Change, Strategic Organization, and Organization Studies. Dr Ansari's expertise in executive education includes strategic management, technological and business model innovation, social innovation, and corporate social responsibility. He has contributed to executive education programs in many organizations, including McKinsey, Airbus. Shell, British Telecom, China Development Bank, Nokia, Laing O'Rourke, UNICEF, Essex County Council, KLEC (Kuala Lumpur Education City).

Previous Education

University of Cambridge MPhil Management Studies 2001

Megan Ansbro

  • Alumni
  • 2015
  • United States
  • PhD Pharmacology
  • King's College
Megan Ansbro

Megan Ansbro

  • Alumni
  • 2015
  • United States
  • PhD Pharmacology
  • King's College

Born and raised in Conneaut, Ohio, I attended college nearby at Denison University. During my undergraduate studies, I performed research in cellular biology and quickly became intrigued by the ways in which genetic changes can cause (and even promote!) disease, specifically cancer. My passion for scientific research and medicine led me to pursue a combined MD/PhD degree. I am currently finishing my second year of medical school at the University of California, Irvine and will begin my PhD in the Department of Pharmacology at Cambridge and the National Institutes of Health in the National Cancer Institute. My PhD work will analyze the role of multi-drug transporters in the development of cancer cell resistance to chemotherapeutic treatments. I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to study as a Gates Scholar and NIH Cambridge Scholar. I know my time as a Gates Scholar will greatly enhance my understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance and my ability to harness this knowledge to advance treatment methods. The integrative nature of my PhD studies at Cambridge will provide the optimal foundation from which I can continue to evolve as a researcher, physician, teacher, and continual learner. Interests: Music (vocal, Broadway, opera), cycling, triathlons, hiking, traveling, and languages (in particular, Austrian dialects)

Oliver Antczak

  • Scholar
  • 2019
  • Poland, Venezuela
  • PhD Archaeology
  • Downing College
Oliver Antczak

Oliver Antczak

  • Scholar
  • 2019
  • Poland, Venezuela
  • PhD Archaeology
  • Downing College

Being born in a turbulent Venezuela to a family of Polish immigrants, the intricacies of identity were an important topic of my everyday life. With parents and a brother all archaeologists, I grew up excavating every summer on the sunny islands of the Venezuelan Caribbean. For my undergraduate thesis at Leiden University College, I merged both these experiences working with the Guaiquerí indigenous group on Margarita island, Venezuela. There I attempted to understand how the Guaiquerí have maintained their strong identity though five centuries of colonialism. For my MPhil at the University of Cambridge, I decided to continue working on the topic with the Caquetío on Bonaire, who maintain a strong indigenous identity despite most locals believing they no longer exist. This work has made me realize that heritage management is not appropriately equipped to understand the resilience of indigenous identities in the Caribbean. For my PhD, I will work with more case-studies of indigenous identity in the Caribbean to deliver data on how identity and heritage are managed and maintained in these (post)colonial contexts. Misunderstood identity processes are an important part of many problems facing the region, including the current situation in Venezuela. I envision that my research can help both the communities I work with as well as academia and heritage institutions, leading to positive changes regionally, nationally and internationally.

Ross Anthony

  • Alumni
  • South Africa
  • 2005 PhD Social Anthropology
  • Pembroke College
Ross Anthony

Ross Anthony

  • Alumni
  • South Africa
  • 2005 PhD Social Anthropology
  • Pembroke College

I have spent the last year doing fieldwork in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. My research examines ways in which frontier cities of western China are changing under post-Mao reforms. I am particularly interested in how the spatial organization of large-scale state and commercial ventures influence people’s behaviour at the micro-level.

Christina Antoniou

  • Scholar
  • 2019
  • Cyprus
  • PhD Clinical Neurosciences
  • Corpus Christi College
Christina Antoniou

Christina Antoniou

  • Scholar
  • 2019
  • Cyprus
  • PhD Clinical Neurosciences
  • Corpus Christi College

During my undergraduate studies in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, I was exposed to a range of disciplines spanning biochemistry, genetics, and physiology through to higher cognitive brain functions. Whilst specialising in Neuroscience, I realised how fascinating the nervous system is, as well as the fact that such an elaborate neuronal connectivity does not come without a cost, since subtle perturbations can lead to devastating disease. Captivated by the elegance of the brain, I continued with a Masters in Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge. This fuelled my desire to pursue a future in research. During my PhD in Clinical Neurosciences, I seek to explore the mechanisms by which some viruses and inflammatory stimuli promote axon degeneration and neuronal death. The ultimate goal of my research is to contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for viral and inflammatory neuropathies. It is an absolute honour to be part of the Gates Cambridge community and I am looking forward to working and learning with inspiring individuals from all around the world.

Michael Antosiewicz

  • Alumni
  • 2018
  • United States
  • MPhil Classics
  • Sidney Sussex College
Michael Antosiewicz

Michael Antosiewicz

  • Alumni
  • 2018
  • United States
  • MPhil Classics
  • Sidney Sussex College

As an undergraduate at Rutgers I discovered my intellectual passions at the nexus of Classical languages and cultural history. Through my work on a newly-discovered papal archive in Rome (the Archivio Boncompagni Ludovisi at the Villa Aurora), I began to engage with the complex social, cultural and political histories of the Classical tradition and its legacies. At Cambridge, I will integrate these focuses by studying Roman historiography and Classical reception. My central concern involves historical consciousness and the sociology of memory. I am fascinated with how the category of the Classics is under negotiation and frames the way cultures interact with the past and their own histories. Ultimately, I intend to take a comparative approach to the Classical tradition and concentrate on its legacy in the nineteenth century United States. I am particularly interested in history education, especially in underserved communities, and in continuing my work at the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in New York City. I am inexpressibly honored to join the Gates Cambridge community. I recognize that this distinction challenges me to ensure that my studies and energies benefit others.

Ioanna Antypas

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2004 PhD Materials Science and Metallurgy
  • Queens' College
Ioanna Antypas

Ioanna Antypas

  • Alumni
  • United States
  • 2004 PhD Materials Science and Metallurgy
  • Queens' College

Yanna attended the University of Cambridge 2000-2007 (Newnham & Queens'), where she earned a B.A., M.Sci., MA, and PhD. Her research (October 2004-2007), undertaken in the High Resolution Electron Microscopy Group (Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy), focused on the development of novel theoretical approaches for magnetic induction mapping in the transmission electron microscope - work relevant to the nano-scale reconstruction of both internal and external magnetic fields in technologically important materials. From Cambridge, Yanna transitioned into a Washington, DC career in climate/energy policy, serving in various analytic offices and functions of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Energy Information Administration, 2008 - 6/2015. Currently, she manages a small solar photovoltaic plant in Northern Greece, while also pursuing independent research into climate change mitigation pathways.

Naoki Arakawa

  • Scholar
  • 2018
  • Japan
  • PhD Astronomy
  • Darwin College
Naoki Arakawa

Naoki Arakawa

  • Scholar
  • 2018
  • Japan
  • PhD Astronomy
  • Darwin College

Graduating from University of Tokyo in physics and Princeton University in theoretical astrophysics, at Cambridge I am working on high-energy astrophysics to reveal the physical mechanism of black holes: accretion disks and relativistic physics in the vicinity of black holes as well as their large-scale influence and cosmic feedback from supermassive black holes. I have been involved in promoting diversity and academic globalization and supporting the students who pursue higher/overseas education and who suffer from various obstacles in their backgrounds. Moreover, in my life I have been deeply engaged in the following social issues and family health affairs: caregiving problems (full long-term in-home care for those who have chronic/terminal disease such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease and disabilities; lack of medical care, helpers and facilities; an aging population) and multifaceted issues regarding children's education and health. I am profoundly honored to be a Gates scholar. Joining the diverse and interdisciplinary Gates community would significantly help me keep striving to address and ameliorate the serious situations not only domestically but internationally in cooperation with the global Gates scholars.

Andrea Aramburu Villavisencio

  • Scholar
  • 2018
  • Peru
  • PhD Latin American Studies
  • Girton College
Andrea Aramburu Villavisencio

Andrea Aramburu Villavisencio

  • Scholar
  • 2018
  • Peru
  • PhD Latin American Studies
  • Girton College

I began to develop an interest in visual studies as a teenager, when I had my first encounters with films that sought to be something more than mere tools of entertainment. In my mind, I began to formulate questions regarding the relationship between this kind of cinema and the context wherein I grew up: Latin America. What are the implications of the film industry for a developing country? What does cinema can do for cultural policies? And conversely? Studying Hispanic Literature in Peru enriched my knowledge on Latin American literature, but, above all, it offered me the theoretical tools to start thinking about cultural representations from a critical viewpoint. After college, I worked as a teaching assistant at my university, and became actively engaged in several film projects, trying to build a bridge between my knowledge of film theory and the film industry. My time at KCL, in London, where I pursued the Contemporary Literature, Culture and Theory MA strengthened my desire to take the academic path, so I can intervene in society and contribute towards genuine change. At Cambridge, my PhD in Latin American Studies will undertake the study of the complex interactions between disruptive kinships, affect and aesthetics in the films of Argentinian filmmakers Lucrecia Martel and Milagros Mumenthaler. I am specially interested in asking how these films open up a broader critique concerning our ways of being in common.

Nushin Arbabzadah

  • Alumni
  • Germany
  • 2001 MPhil Oriental Studies
  • Pembroke College
Nushin Arbabzadah

Nushin Arbabzadah

  • Alumni
  • Germany
  • 2001 MPhil Oriental Studies
  • Pembroke College

Scott Arcenas

  • Alumni
  • 2010
  • United States
  • MPhil Classics
  • Clare College
Scott Arcenas

Scott Arcenas

  • Alumni
  • 2010
  • United States
  • MPhil Classics
  • Clare College

Up through my senior year in high school, I intended to study politics and then to pursue a career in public policy, but as a freshman in college I was--very fortunately, as it turns out--forced to take a year of Latin in order to fulfill my language requirement. Much to my surprise, I immediately fell in love with both the language itself and the world of ancient history to which it gave me access. As an undergraduate, I devoted much of my attention to the study of Athenian democratic reform, and I hope to continue my research on that topic as an MPhil candidate at Cambridge. My ultimate goal is to obtain a PhD and eventual employment as a university professor, for I can think of nothing more rewarding than the opportunity to share my love for the ancient world with those who, like me, were not fortunate enough to encounter Classics prior to college.

Diane Archer

  • Alumni
  • Thailand
  • 2005 MPhil Planning Growth and Regeneration
    2006 PhD Land Economy
  • Sidney Sussex College
Diane Archer

Diane Archer

  • Alumni
  • Thailand
  • 2005 MPhil Planning Growth and Regeneration
    2006 PhD Land Economy
  • Sidney Sussex College

I am a Research Fellow at Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) Asia, based in Bangkok. I work on urban development issues ranging from urban climate resilience to urban health and wellbeing in South and South East Asian cities.

Jeronimo Arellano

  • Alumni
  • Ecuador
  • 2005 MPhil Latin American Studies
  • Clare Hall
Jeronimo Arellano

Jeronimo Arellano

  • Alumni
  • Ecuador
  • 2005 MPhil Latin American Studies
  • Clare Hall

My current research focuses on the interaction between alphabetic writing and other systems of inscription -the Inca quipu, in particular- in colonial texts from the Andes region. I am also interested in the representation of narratives of origin in contemporary Latin American cinema and visual arts.

Albert Arhin

  • Alumni
  • 2012
  • Ghana
  • PhD Geography
  • Emmanuel College
Albert Arhin

Albert Arhin

  • Alumni
  • 2012
  • Ghana
  • PhD Geography
  • Emmanuel College

I am currently completing my PhD studies at the Department of Geography. My research is focused on evolution of ideas about conservation, climate change and natural resource development, how they are translated into specific interventions in different geographical contexts and the politics of what happens when they are implemented in specific project sites. Specifically, I am examining the evolution, translation and politics of the idea of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+), which is a prominent climate change policy in the context of Ghana. West Africa. I am alumni of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Ghana and also studied at the University of Leeds, UK as a Commonwealth Scholar. Previously, I worked as the Research and Policy Manager and also as a Health Policy Manager for Oxfam in Ghana.

Carlota Armillas Mateos

  • Alumni
  • 2019
  • Spain
  • MPhil Engineering for Sustainable Development
  • Peterhouse
Carlota Armillas Mateos

Carlota Armillas Mateos

  • Alumni
  • 2019
  • Spain
  • MPhil Engineering for Sustainable Development
  • Peterhouse

The tales about great engineers my mom used to tell me when I was a little girl growing up in El Puerto de Santa María made me want to become an engineer and invent things to help others. During my double degree in Mechanical + Industrial Design & Product Development Engineering in Cadiz University, I developed an interest in sustainability, regarding my future responsibility on consumer products whose manufacturing, usage and end-of-life will impact our ecosystem. For this reason, I use eco-design techniques in my projects, like the design of an ergonomic infant radiant warmer, a ship bulbous bow for Navantia Shipyards or technical help for the blind (national runner up in the James Dyson Award). My work experience in INNANOMAT R&D group has taught me how difficult it is to implement eco-design strategies, as economic profitability often seems to be the only concern. However, I believe it is my duty as an engineer to use my creativity to find solutions that take into consideration the present needs (like the pursuit of social fairness) and problems (such as pollution or resource depletion) in addition to economic profits. Improving people's lives is the aim of engineering, but I think we are not doing it ok if our creations imply negative consequences for people or the ecosystem. During my MPhil in Engineering for Sustainable Development, I want to learn how to do engineering not only about numbers and data but also about taking care of our ecosystem, of life on Earth.

Sarah Armitage

  • Alumni
  • 2012
  • United States
  • MPhil Economic and Social History
  • Jesus College
Sarah Armitage

Sarah Armitage

  • Alumni
  • 2012
  • United States
  • MPhil Economic and Social History
  • Jesus College

Currently working as a research assistant at MIT's Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, I will begin a PhD in energy and environmental economics at Harvard University in fall 2016. As a Gates Scholar, I completed the M.Phil. in Economic and Social History at Cambridge, after graduating from Yale University last spring with a B.A. in history.

Jenna Armstrong

  • Scholar-elect
  • 2020
  • United States
  • PhD Physiology, Development & Neuroscience
  • Jesus College
Jenna Armstrong

Jenna Armstrong

  • Scholar-elect
  • 2020
  • United States
  • PhD Physiology, Development & Neuroscience
  • Jesus College

Jeanne-Rose Arn

  • Scholar-elect
  • 2019
  • Switzerland
  • PhD Legal Studies
  • King's College
Jeanne-Rose Arn

Jeanne-Rose Arn

  • Scholar-elect
  • 2019
  • Switzerland
  • PhD Legal Studies
  • King's College

I obtained advanced degrees both in law and in philosophy (studying at the University of Geneva and at Harvard Law School). In philosophy, my courses focused on analytic philosophy and philosophy of mind. This is where I first encountered the topic of self-deception which has become the focus of my proposed research. After my studies, I practiced law at a leading law firm in Switzerland where I handled a high-profile case of “conscious negligence”, that diminishes responsibility under Swiss Criminal Law. This experience triggered my interest in the fundamental conditions of moral and legal responsibility as well as the limits of responsibility in law. For my PhD, I intend to address the question of self-deception in morality and law. Minimally, self-deception denotes a phenomenon that occurs when a person acquires and maintains a false belief despite possessing evidence to the contrary. Self-deception may lead to acts or behaviour that result in wrongdoings and harm others and is therefore a critical topic for both morality and the law. Despite this, the significance of self-deception in law remains largely unexplored.