Scholar named next generation leader for his policy work

  • September 10, 2020
Scholar named next generation leader for his policy work

Geo Saba is named a MENA-American Next Generation Leader for his work in the political sphere.

I am very gratefulĀ and honored to be named a MENA-American Next Generation Leader. I am very proud of my Lebanese roots and deeply saddened by the recent devastation in Lebanon.

Geo Saba

A Gates Cambridge Scholar has been recognised as a Middle Eastern and North African American National Security & Foreign Policy Next Generation Leader.

Geo Saba, who did his MPhil in International Relations at the University of Cambridge, was selected as one of 30 next generation MENA leaders by the Diversity in National Security Network and New America. It is the first year of the awards.

The 30 future leaders were selected “based on their demonstrated leadership potential, current work in national security or foreign policy, career excellence, contributions to their areas of expertise, and commitment to serving their communities”.

Geo is the Legislative Director for US Congressman Ro Khanna, who represents Silicon Valley, and previously was National Security Advisor to Khanna. Geo advises him on the House Armed Services Committee and helped spearhead his efforts to block funding for a war against Iran as well as to pass the Yemen War Powers Resolution which aimed to get the US to withdraw from involvement in the war in Yemen, but was vetoed by President Trump. Geo has also worked on two bills for Khanna that President Trump signed into law, the Veterans Apprenticeship and Labor Opportunity Reform Act which makes it easier for employers to create apprenticeship programmes in multiple states, providing more opportunities for veterans, as well as the 21st Century Integrated Digital Experience Act, which aims to improve the digital experience for government customers and reinforces existing requirements for federal public websites.

Geo [2015], who is of Lebanese origin, was a research assistant for former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice while he was an undergraduate at Stanford and has interned for San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and in the Obama White House.

Speaking about the award, he said: “I am very grateful and honored to be named a MENA-American Next Generation Leader. I am very proud of my Lebanese roots and deeply saddened by the recent devastation in Lebanon. I’d like to thank the Gates Cambridge Scholarship for providing me with an incredible education and foundation to work on these issues I care about.”

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