Current Scholars

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Below you will find comprehensive information about your Gates Cambridge Scholarship and the many elements of the current scholar community. You can use the table of contents at the top of the page to navigate to the relevant section and also ctrl+f (or Apple button +F) to find any content on the page.

If you have feedback on this page or have a question that is not answered here please email scholar.support@gatescambridge.org.

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  1. Who's who
  2. Arrival & settling in
  3. Finances
  4. Policies & regulations
  5. Events & activities
  6. Networking & resources
  7. Gates Scholars Common Room (GSCR)
  8. Outreach and promotion
  9. Help, support & well-being
  10. Contact

Who's who

The Trust

The Trust’s Programme Team are here to support and help Scholars in all matters relating to their scholarship. If, after reading this page, you have any questions about your award or progress please email scholar.support@gatescambridge.org. If you are unsure when you should contact the Trust, please see the Contact section below.

Scholars’ Council

The Gates Cambridge Scholars’ Council is a body of current Scholars elected by Scholars which is fully funded by the Trust.  Through its Officers, the Council represents the interests and needs of current Scholars to the Trust and the Gates Cambridge Alumni Association.

The Scholars’ Council supports the aims of the Gates Cambridge Scholarship to create a network of responsible global leaders.  Drawing on the experiences and aspirations of the entire Gates Cambridge Community, the Council strives to enrich the academic, social and professional lives of all Scholars. The Council organises a number of events and activities during the year. Scholar’s Council elections are held in Michaelmas and Easter, with Officers’ terms running for 6 or 12 months (12 months for President/VP). Several positions are appointed with applications in Michaelmas for the Orientation Co-Directors and for the Editors of the Scholar and in Michaelmas/Easter for the LfP co-directors.

You can find further information about the Council (including contact details of each Officer listed below)

Miss Andrea Kusec

  • President
  • The President/Chair of the Scholars' Council oversees its activities and liaises with the Trust on behalf of Scholars. Contact the President at president@gatescouncil.org
Miss Andrea Kusec

Miss Andrea Kusec

  • President
  • The President/Chair of the Scholars' Council oversees its activities and liaises with the Trust on behalf of Scholars. Contact the President at president@gatescouncil.org

I became interested in the brain and mind when I was diagnosed with epilepsy at age 13. I pursued a BA in Psychology at Ryerson University, where I became interested in the development and treatment of cognitive biases in mood disorders. While volunteering on the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Unit of Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, I developed an interest in designing treatments for cognitive and emotional difficulties in individuals with an ABI that account for their unique impairments. To further my knowledge of ABI, I obtained an MSc in Rehabilitation Science at McMaster University. Many people with an ABI have symptoms of depression, but available methods of treating mood disorders such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy fall short because they rely heavily on domains often compromised in ABI, such as mental flexibility, comprehension, and memory. As a student in the Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, I will investigate whether depression in ABI can be treated by increasing engagement in positive activities, and whether this treatment can be enhanced through cognitive training to facilitate planning and engagement in such activities. If effective, this research could immediately influence rehabilitation services worldwide.

Previous Education

Ryerson University
McMaster University

Miss Nora Martin

  • Vice-President
  • The Vice President/Secretary works with the President to coordinate Council activities and to liaise with the Trust. Contact vice-president@gatescouncil.org
Miss Nora Martin

Miss Nora Martin

  • Vice-President
  • The Vice President/Secretary works with the President to coordinate Council activities and to liaise with the Trust. Contact vice-president@gatescouncil.org

As an undergraduate in Physics at the University of Oxford, I became fascinated with applying physical, mathematical and computational methods to biology. One area, where these have already had a big impact, is in our understanding of evolution, and my current research is on modelling evolution in Professor Ard Louis’ group in Oxford, where the focus is on studying genotype-phenotype maps as these allow us to model both variation and selection. Last summer, I analysed the properties of the genotype-phenotype map of the model system of biomorphs and I am currently working on the causes and effects of bursts in the production of alternative phenotypes. At Cambridge, I will join Dr Sebastian Ahnert’s group and I am excited about exploring characteristics of new genotype-phenotype maps and their implications for evolutionary dynamics. My goal is to pursue a career in research because I have enjoyed the process of answering open-ended questions in my research projects over the last two years: I have gained insights into experimental work in atomic physics, data analysis in astronomy, and computational work in biological physics, not only in the UK, but also as a Hoffleit Scholar at Yale University in the US and at the University of Stuttgart in Germany. Outside of research and academics, I have taught lessons about environmental issues at a school in Oxford and have organised and run weekly physics talks and classes as president of the Oxford University Physics Society.

Previous Education

University of Oxford

Miss Gabrielle Mills

  • Treasurer
  • Contact the Treasurer at treasurer@gatescouncil.org
Miss Gabrielle Mills

Miss Gabrielle Mills

  • Treasurer
  • Contact the Treasurer at treasurer@gatescouncil.org

From a young age, I expressed a keen interest in the issues surrounding infectious diseases and global epidemics. As a Biomedical Engineering student at Arizona State University, my interest in epidemiology and its engineering applications were further developed and contextualized by an additional minor in Global Health and a research internship at the Translational Genomics Research Institute. During the course of my PhD in Chemical Engineering at Cambridge, I aspire to develop novel diagnostics for C. difficile, the deadliest superbug in the United States, and C. perfringens, the second leading cause of food poisoning. With C. difficile, there is a direct correlation between mortality and the timing and choice of initial treatment. With the invention of an immediate diagnostic that detects the level of infection, mortality rates may be reduced across global communities.I seek to be a leader in the worldwide pursuit to alleviate the burden of disease on developing populations by delivering technologies that are simple, inexpensive, and—above all else—feasible in their applicable environments. I am grateful to be joining the Gates Cambridge Community and for the opportunity to network with some of the greatest intellects of our generation with the united goal of improving the human condition.

Previous Education

Arizona State University BS in Engineering Biomedical Engineering 2019

Ms Dorien Braam

  • Alumni Officer
  • The Alumni Officer works closely with the Gates Cambridge Alumni Association to connect the Scholar and Alumni communities.
Ms Dorien Braam

Ms Dorien Braam

  • Alumni Officer
  • The Alumni Officer works closely with the Gates Cambridge Alumni Association to connect the Scholar and Alumni communities.

Having worked in a variety of roles across Asia and eastern Africa with the UN, INGO's and government focusing on disaster displacement, human rights and shelter, I returned to academia via a MSc in International Animal Health at the University of Edinburgh. My thesis research on ‘Animal health programming in humanitarian and development assistance in Somalia’ showed the gaps and need for high quality research and critical assessment to improve the evidence base for policy and program development. For my PhD in Veterinary Medicine I will study the prevalence of zoonoses - diseases transmitted between animals and humans - in displaced populations, addressing some of the most pressing global challenges of the next decade: climate change, displacement and emerging infectious diseases. Disease transmission between wildlife and livestock, the increased risk of zoonoses in areas where people and animals with weakened immune systems live closely together, and the emergence of infectious diseases among naive host communities are areas that need to be increasingly researched. Gaining a better understanding of disease prevalence and dynamics, control and prevention will improve the well-being of both humans and animals, with the aim to influence and improve institutional responses. I am incredibly honored that I can pursue this important field of study at the University of Cambridge with the support of the Gates Scholarship, and look forward to becoming a part of the community.

Previous Education

Technische Universiteit Delft
The University of Edinburgh

Miss Reetika Subramanian

  • Editor-in-Chief of The Scholar magazine
  • The Editor-in-Chief is responsible for the production of the annual The Scholar magazine. Email: eic@gatescouncil.org
Miss Reetika Subramanian

Miss Reetika Subramanian

  • Editor-in-Chief of The Scholar magazine
  • The Editor-in-Chief is responsible for the production of the annual The Scholar magazine. Email: eic@gatescouncil.org

Early marriage and bridal trafficking in Rajasthan, sexual violence in Mumbai, female circumcision among Dawoodi Bohras: my experiences as a journalist and researcher have exposed me to diverse geographies, socio-economic realities and cultural prejudices that young women across India face. Home, however, is the place where I first found my bearings. As a survivor of domestic violence, my feminism got defined by my mother's everyday negotiations within the structures that cultivate and normalise the culture of silence. It drove me to challenge patriarchal notions of leadership and become sensitive to differences. Gender became a way of seeing the world. Backed by my rich field insights, multimedia skills and a feminist consciousness, I am excited to return to Cambridge to pursue my PhD as a Gates Cambridge scholar. My study straddles the areas of climate justice and gender equality. In India's historically drought-prone and caste-ridden Marathwada region, I seek to combine a multi-sited feminist ethnography with an informed interpretation of oral folk poetry, to understand the historical compulsions, lived experiences and gendered labour burdens of Dalit and Adivasi girls in a climate crisis. My fundamental interest in pursuing the project stems from my yearning to reconcile collaborative storytelling with pressing marginalised realities.

Previous Education

University of Cambridge Multi-disciplinary Gender Stud 2017
Tata Institute of Social Sciences Media and Cultural Studies 2015

Mr Shahriar (Shawn) Zamani

  • Deputy Editor-in-Chief of The Scholar magazine
  • The DEIC supports the EIC in the production of The Scholar magazine. Email: deic@gatescouncil.org
Mr Shahriar (Shawn) Zamani

Mr Shahriar (Shawn) Zamani

  • Deputy Editor-in-Chief of The Scholar magazine
  • The DEIC supports the EIC in the production of The Scholar magazine. Email: deic@gatescouncil.org

Previous Education

University of South Florida Bachelor of Science in Public Health 2018
Hillsborough Community College Associate of Arts in Chemistry 2016

Mr Grant Simpson

  • Assistant Editor of the Scholar
  • The Assistant Editor is part of a three person team which produces The Scholar magazine. Email: ae@gatescouncil.org
Mr Grant Simpson

Mr Grant Simpson

  • Assistant Editor of the Scholar
  • The Assistant Editor is part of a three person team which produces The Scholar magazine. Email: ae@gatescouncil.org

I graduated from the University of Florida with highest honours and the equivalent of class valedictorian. There, I completed my B.S. degree double majoring in Chemistry and Cognitive/Behavioral Neuroscience with a minor in Philosophy. My previous research involvements have varied widely, ranging from healthcare disparities to behavioral neuroscience to stem cell biology to synthetic chemistry and pharmacology. I ultimately gravitated towards chemistry because I saw the unique power chemists possess to develop novel therapies and therefore profoundly improve an indefinite number of lives. Under the auspices of the Gates Cambridge Scholarship, I will be reading for an MPhil in Chemistry at Christ’s College, working in the Gonçalo Bernardes research group with the aim of developing new, more selective cancer therapeutics. In this project, we have chosen a bold and innovative approach of using quadruple helical DNA structures as platforms to hold both cancer-targeting antibodies and cancer-cell-killing drugs. Further, I will develop synthetic methods to chemically link these different classes of biomolecules (i.e., DNA and protein). With these novel and beautiful structures, we hope to circumvent the poor efficacy and terrible side effects of current, standard-of-care chemotherapy and increase the therapeutic utility of first generation antibody-drug conjugates, with the ultimate goal improving human life and patient outcomes.

Previous Education

University of Florida

Mr Davide Martino

  • Internal Officer
  • The Internal Officer oversees the Scholars' Common Room and organises Internal Symposia each term.
Mr Davide Martino

Mr Davide Martino

  • Internal Officer
  • The Internal Officer oversees the Scholars' Common Room and organises Internal Symposia each term.

As a child, two of my favourite books were a collection of Greek myths, mainly from the Iliad and the Odyssey, and a biography of Alexander the Great; both a love for books and a curiosity for the past have stayed with me since. I was lucky to grow up in Italy first, then in Belgium, and when I made the leap across the Channel to study History at Cambridge I already saw myself as a European citizen. My fascination for the philosophes of the Enlightenment initially lured me towards the eighteenth century, but a combination of chance and opportunity led me to focus on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries instead. As I researched the history of a Florentine family relocating to South Germany in the midst of the Thirty Years’ War for my Master’s, I found in the past some parallels with my own experience of transnational movement. For my PhD I will cross not just national but also disciplinary boundaries, investigating the uses of hydraulic knowledge and expertise across three early modern cities, Florence, Augsburg, and Amsterdam. Retracing the careers of hydraulic experts responsible for monumental fountains and mundane sewage systems alike, my work will be at the crossroads between the history of science, art history, and environmental history. In particular, I intend to contribute to the field of water history, which has very concrete implications for the present, and for ensuring that we can continue to hold water in shared and sustainable possession with fellow humans.

Previous Education

Birmingham City University Education (Primary) 2019
University of Cambridge Early Modern History 2017
University of Cambridge History 2016

Ms Emma Soneson

  • External Community Officer
  • The External Community Officer promotes scholar involvement in the community. Contact the Officer at external@gatescouncil.org
Ms Emma Soneson

Ms Emma Soneson

  • External Community Officer
  • The External Community Officer promotes scholar involvement in the community. Contact the Officer at external@gatescouncil.org

With undergraduate degrees in Italian and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and past research experience in primate behaviour and orthopaedics, I might seem at first a bit of an unusual candidate for a PhD in Psychiatry. My interests in child and adolescent mental health and appreciation for population approaches to improving health and wellbeing developed through my work at Yale and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. I am particularly interested in understanding the role of schools in mental health promotion and prevention. In 2016-17, I completed my MPhil in Public Health at Cambridge with a research focus on the acceptability of school-based identification of mental health difficulties. For my PhD, I will continue to work with Professor Peter Jones, Dr Emma Howarth, and Professor Mina Fazel (Oxford) on this research as we design, implement, and evaluate different models of school-based identification. By increasing early identification rates, we hope to improve access to care and support for children and young people who are experiencing mental health difficulties and ultimately improve their long-term psychosocial outcomes. I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity to spend another three years in Cambridge surrounded by inspiring mentors, colleagues, and friends, and am honoured and excited to join the Gates Cambridge community!

Previous Education

Yale University
University of Cambridge

Ms Anna Forringer-Beal

  • Social Officer
  • The Social Officers plan a variety of events in Cambridge and trips further afield throughout the year. Contact the Social Officers at social@gatescouncil.org
Ms Anna Forringer-Beal

Ms Anna Forringer-Beal

  • Social Officer
  • The Social Officers plan a variety of events in Cambridge and trips further afield throughout the year. Contact the Social Officers at social@gatescouncil.org

After seeing firsthand how the law impacted the daily lives of women through the Undocumented Migration Project or on the National Human Trafficking Hotline, I felt compelled to study the construction of laws and the cultural attitudes which influence them. Through an MPhil in Gender Studies at Cambridge, I was able to explore how stereotypes about immigrants and sex workers impacted data gathering, victim assistance, and ultimately limited the scope of the UK Modern Slavery Act of 2015. I am humbled to be returning to the Gates Scholar’s Community to expand this project through a PhD in Gender Studies. By constructing a genealogy of anti-trafficking law stretching back to the White Slave Panics of the late 1800’s, I aim to show that anti-trafficking laws are currently constrained by xenophobic thought. It is my hope that this work will refocus anti-trafficking policy to human rights and survivor support as the most effective tools in combating trafficking. When not writing about human trafficking, I can be found baking, boxing, or fastidiously reorganizing my to-do lists.

Previous Education

University of Cambridge MPhil Gender Studies 2018
University of Michigan Bachelor of Arts Anthropology 2016

Mr Dhruv Nandamudi

  • Social Officer
  • The Social Officers plan a variety of events in Cambridge and trips further afield throughout the year. Contact the Social Officers at social@gatescouncil.org
Mr Dhruv Nandamudi

Mr Dhruv Nandamudi

  • Social Officer
  • The Social Officers plan a variety of events in Cambridge and trips further afield throughout the year. Contact the Social Officers at social@gatescouncil.org

As an undergraduate researcher at the Yale’s Center for Emotional Intelligence and Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab, I grew particularly interested in exploring the impact of psychosocial stress on neurological subsystems. In my capacity as director of the Yale Wellness Project, I helped design and conduct a large-scale study aimed at better understanding the role of stress in student life, and mitigating its more deleterious neural effects through the implementation of targeted interventional efforts. At Cambridge’s MRC CBU, my PhD will focus on exploring the neuroscientific relationship between stress and memory control, or, more broadly, motivated forgetting, through a combination of neuroimaging and molecular paradigms. From a clinical standpoint, memory control as such refers to a cognitive process that involves the active suppression of emotionally valent memories in response to environmental triggers, and thereby constitutes a barrier to negative affective states. This bears particular relevance to mental health science for the clinical treatment of mood and anxiety-related disorders. My goal is to better understand the mechanisms guiding the interaction between stress and motivated forgetting in an effort to inform potential treatment methodologies for psychological disorders by enhancing cognitive emotion regulation. I am profoundly honored to be a part of the Gates Cambridge community, and its network of scholars dedicated to bettering the human condition.

Previous Education

Yale University Bachelor of Science in Psychology 2018

Miss Michelle Ko

  • Technology Officer
  • The Technology Officers are responsible for maintaining the electronic hardware and software in the Scholars' Common Room. Contact the Technology Officers at tech@gatescouncil.org
Miss Michelle Ko

Miss Michelle Ko

  • Technology Officer
  • The Technology Officers are responsible for maintaining the electronic hardware and software in the Scholars' Common Room. Contact the Technology Officers at tech@gatescouncil.org

While growing up next to the library in Cockeysville, Maryland, I came to love stories. After reading hundreds of books, I consider the grandest origin story to be the curious saga of how we developed from a single cell into who we are today. Even more exciting to me is that this remarkable journey still has many questions left unanswered. To explore this further, I am pursuing a degree in Human Developmental and Regenerative Biology at Harvard University and conducting research in autism spectrum disorder and cortical development in the Arlotta Lab. Through this research and my coursework, I became interested in how the nervous and immune systems communicate with each other in sickness and in health. During my PhD at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, I will explore this theme in Andrew McKenzie’s group and I aim to interpret the dialogue between the nervous system and innate lymphoid cells. I hope that this research of fundamental interactions will empower the field to understand neuro-immune diseases better. I am immensely excited and grateful to join the vibrant and passionate community of Gates Cambridge Scholars.

Previous Education

Harvard University AB Developmental Biology 2019

Ms Anna Guasco

  • Learning for Purpose Co-Director
  • Learning for purpose officers lead and organise a curriculum and series of workshops aimed at skills development for scholars. Contact at learningforpurpose@gatescouncil.org
Ms Anna Guasco

Ms Anna Guasco

  • Learning for Purpose Co-Director
  • Learning for purpose officers lead and organise a curriculum and series of workshops aimed at skills development for scholars. Contact at learningforpurpose@gatescouncil.org

While studying at Carleton College in Minnesota and working as a park ranger at my local national park in coastal California, I found myself drawn to the unexpected connections between storytelling, history, environment, and justice. I centred my undergraduate and postgraduate research around these interdisciplinary interests, obtaining a B.A. in American Studies at Carleton and an M.Sc. in Environment, Culture and Society as an Avangrid Scholar at the University of Edinburgh. In my doctoral research in Geography at the University of Cambridge, I will study geographies, histories, and narratives of grey whale migration and conservation along the North American Pacific Coast. Through this work, I aim to examine how stories affect perceptions of historical encounters and outcomes of contemporary encounters, and to assess how storytelling interacts with issues of justice. In addition, I am passionate about public engagement, access, and accessibility. My interest in public engagement and access has been shaped by professional, academic, and service experiences, including volunteering as an environmental educator and education consultant, organizing Carleton’s first ‘BioBlitz’, serving as a resident assistant and public scholarship fellow at Carleton, supporting a local city council member’s environmental justice advocacy, and conducting independent research on environmental history, ethics, and aesthetics with Channel Islands National Park. As a Gates Cambridge Scholar, I hope to collaborate with other Scholars and Cambridge community members to promote equitable access to research, education, and storytelling.

Previous Education

University of Edinburgh Master of Science Environment, Culture & Society 2017
Carleton College Bachelor of Arts American Studies 2016

Ms Avani Tandon Vieira

  • Learning for Purpose Co-Director
  • Learning for purpose officers lead and organise a curriculum and series of workshops aimed at skills development for scholars. Contact at learningforpurpose@gatescouncil.org
Ms Avani Tandon Vieira

Ms Avani Tandon Vieira

  • Learning for Purpose Co-Director
  • Learning for purpose officers lead and organise a curriculum and series of workshops aimed at skills development for scholars. Contact at learningforpurpose@gatescouncil.org

Over years of studying literature, first as an undergraduate at St. Stephen's College, Delhi and then as a Master's student at the University of Oxford, I have developed an appreciation for the narratives that often go unheard. My work considers independent literary expression in India and turns to the ways in which writing and documentation can transform how we occupy, understand, and move in the world. By looking to minority voices, through scholarship and curatorial work, I hope to bring attention to the politics of artistic practice, building spaces that are are aware both of their potential and their responsibility.

Previous Education

University of Oxford World Literatures in English 2017
University of Delhi English 2016

Mr Minaam Abbas

  • Orientation Co-Director
  • The Orientation officers lead and organise the new Scholar orientation activities. Contact the Orientation Committee at orientation@gatescouncil.org
Mr Minaam Abbas

Mr Minaam Abbas

  • Orientation Co-Director
  • The Orientation officers lead and organise the new Scholar orientation activities. Contact the Orientation Committee at orientation@gatescouncil.org

The diverse and innovative realms of biomedical sciences and healthcare captured my imagination since my days at Karachi Grammar School. As I commenced my medical training at Cambridge, I was astounded by the complex collection of molecular machines and networks that formed an unlikely, harmonious cooperative: the human body. I periodically satiated my curiosity with research projects exploring proteins involved in cancer metastasis and novel prognostic tests for chronic liver disease. At Caltech, I also investigated human neural reference frames in Brain Machine Interfaces. This inspired a Part II in Neuroscience, which gradually revealed the dearth of approved medications for neural tumours. This burning necessity drove me to cofound a cancer therapeutics and drug delivery bio-startup, angioClast, which is developing a sophisticated treatment strategy for vascularised tumours. As an MB/PhD student, I hope to study the cryptic world of RNA and DNA modifications at the Kouzarides Lab. This hitherto unexplored field has groundbreaking implications for future therapeutics. During this program, I also hope to further delve into the fascinating fields of public health and health-tech. These interests were shaped by my forays into public policy for Neglected Tropical Diseases, and a micro-financing social venture featured at the Hult Prize Regional Final. In the future, I wish to discover synergies across the journey from bench to bedside, delivering innovative personalised medicine and effective public health interventions.

Previous Education

University of Cambridge

Ms Aishat Yusuf

  • Orientation Co-Director
  • The Orientation officers lead and organise the new Scholar orientation activities. Contact the Orientation Committee at orientation@gatescouncil.org
Ms Aishat Yusuf

Ms Aishat Yusuf

  • Orientation Co-Director
  • The Orientation officers lead and organise the new Scholar orientation activities. Contact the Orientation Committee at orientation@gatescouncil.org

As a child who frequently visited the hospital, many questions about human health boggled my mind. Indeed, these curiosities lead me to the captivating world of the Medical Sciences. I was born and raised in Ogun State, southwestern Nigeria. In 2016, I obtained a full tuition fee waiver to study Biomedicine in Karolinska Institute, Sweden. I have spent my undergraduate summers carrying out research projects in various labs. My interest in cancer research developed during the later part of my education. With cancer being a global disease and a major cause of mortality worldwide, it is of paramount importance that we strive to speed up diagnosis and improve treatment. My PhD project at the MRC cancer unit involves the identification of candidate biomarkers that could be used in patient risk stratification for oesophageal cancer. It is my hope that by identifying these biomarkers, patients at risk can easily be identified and, therefore, be able to seek medical intervention at a very early stage before the disease progresses. At and beyond Cambridge, I hope to work on projects directed towards positively impacting health and lives of people including my home country, Nigeria and the world at large. I am truly humbled and beyond grateful to be part of such a prestigious international scholarship programme.

Previous Education

Karolinska Institute Biomedical Science 2019

Ms Janine Brandes

  • Communications Officer
  • The Communications Officer is the conduit for assembling and distributing information to and about the Scholar community
Ms Janine Brandes

Ms Janine Brandes

  • Communications Officer
  • The Communications Officer is the conduit for assembling and distributing information to and about the Scholar community

With the average life expectancy increasing worldwide, the prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease is predicted to double within the next generation. Despite this rising challenge to public health and numerous clinical trials, there is still no cure for this debilitating disease, highlighting the need for better preclinical models and increased translational research. This motivated me to join efforts unravelling the underlying molecular mechanisms of Parkinson’s during my Master’s thesis in Molecular Medicine at the University of Tübingen. To enable my research to bridge the gap from bench to bedside, I subsequently collaborated with AstraZeneca as a research assistant at the University of Oxford where I established a drug screening pipeline on patient derived cells and succeeded in identifying new drug candidates. For my PhD in Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge, I will employ a cellular 3D model of Parkinson’s disease involving human neurons and glia to continue deciphering the mechanisms driving disease in patient brains. I hope that using this clinically relevant disease model will facilitate the translation of preclinical studies into patient treatment. I am deeply honoured to have been selected for a Gates Cambridge scholarship and am looking forward to joining a community of scholars who aspire to use their academic abilities to improve the lives of others.

Previous Education

Eberhard-Karls-Universitat Tubingen Molecular Medicine 2019
Eberhard-Karls-Universitat Tubingen Molecular Medicine 2016
University of Michigan Psychology, Neuroscience 2015

Mr David Rousso

  • Technology Officer
  • The Technology Officers are responsible for maintaining the electronic hardware and software in the Scholars' Common Room. Contact the Technology Officers at tech@gatescouncil.org
Mr David Rousso

Mr David Rousso

  • Technology Officer
  • The Technology Officers are responsible for maintaining the electronic hardware and software in the Scholars' Common Room. Contact the Technology Officers at tech@gatescouncil.org

During my Nanotechnology Engineering degree at the University of Waterloo, I have come to understand the importance of interdisciplinarity. Being taught everything from biochemistry to controls systems, my research background has been broad from photonic metasurfaces and plasmonic biosensors at Harvard to Bose-Einstein condensates at Cambridge, to muon physics at the Paul Scherrer Institute, and program management at Microsoft Japan doing coding work in machine learning. I will be pursuing a PhD in High Energy Physics at the ATLAS collaboration at Cambridge in the hopes of advancing our understanding of the universe beyond the standard model. My hope is that with a new breakthrough we will be able to stem a new blossoming of world-changing technology just like when Planck made his breakthrough 100 years ago. I am incredibly honoured to join the Gates Cambridge community, and as an interdisciplinary at heart, I am excited for the opportunities this community will give to stem new collaborations. Interdisciplinary collaborations with particle physics have yielded incredibly impactful results, from proton therapy for cancer treatment, to cosmic muon tomography for understanding how the Pyramids were built and the effects of global warming with respect to glacier melting. I also seek to address current issues in STEM outreach, such that we may ensure that every child can pursue their passion in spite of their cultural pressures.

Previous Education

University of Waterloo Nanotechnology Engineering 2019
Hong Kong University of Science & Technology Exchange 2017

Miss Hafsah Haseeb Siddiqui

  • Outreach Officer
  • The Outreach Officer facilitates the scholar community's engagement with alumni, the wider Cambridge network, the public, and potential new applicants. Contact the Outreach Officer at outreach@gatescouncil.org
Miss Hafsah Haseeb Siddiqui

Miss Hafsah Haseeb Siddiqui

  • Outreach Officer
  • The Outreach Officer facilitates the scholar community's engagement with alumni, the wider Cambridge network, the public, and potential new applicants. Contact the Outreach Officer at outreach@gatescouncil.org

While studying Human Geography and Sociology at the University of Toronto, my professors nurtured my interest in examining social inequality and segregation in urban space. I was inspired to contemplate justice-oriented visions of city building and analyze uneven development and political fragmentation within cities which are more pronounced now than ever. At Cambridge, my research will consider how citizen-led development can be employed as a tool for empowering the urban poor in the context of housing inequality and forced evictions from informal settlements in Pakistan. Specifically, I will investigate how cross-class alliances can enhance marginalized groups’ political claims-making abilities and help them assert their status as legitimate urban citizens. Urban theories and policies are largely based on the experiences of a select few cities in the Global North. In response, my scholarly aim is to highlight diverse Southern urban experiences, which will reveal important socio-political particularities about life in cities of the Global South. By inspiring policymakers and researchers, I hope to achieve a future where cities are not divided or fragmented but rather inclusive spaces of collaboration between residents. I am grateful and excited, and humbled most of all, to be joining a community of students who share a strong commitment to changing the world for the better.

Previous Education

University of Toronto Geography 2019
University of Toronto Human Geography, Sociology, Writing & Rhetoric 2018

Miss Bailey Weatherbee

  • Gates Community Officer
  • The Gates Community Officer is responsible for fostering an inclusive Gates Community. Contact the Gates Community Officer at community@gatescouncil.org
Miss Bailey Weatherbee

Miss Bailey Weatherbee

  • Gates Community Officer
  • The Gates Community Officer is responsible for fostering an inclusive Gates Community. Contact the Gates Community Officer at community@gatescouncil.org

Since childhood, I was always fascinated by developmental biology. I wanted to understand how a single cell could become a complex organism. After matriculating as an Honors Biology student at the University of Delaware, I joined Dr. Salil A. Lachke’s developmental genetics laboratory where I studied the role of RNA-binding protein-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in mammalian ocular lens development. Simultaneously, I explored my passions for education access and science advocacy. Since 2014, I’ve worked with Leading Youth Through Empowerment – a non-profit that offers accelerated coursework to high-achieving at-risk youth. I also participated in the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s Advocacy Training Program through which I met with the offices of my senators and representative to advocate for science funding and education.At Cambridge, I will carry out my Ph.D. project in the laboratory of Dr. Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz studying the post-implantation development of human and mouse embryos. Post-implantation stages are referred to as the “black box” of development, and very little is known about these early stages when many pregnancies fail. Recently, Dr. Zernicka-Goetz’s group developed a culture system that opened this “black box” and I look forward to finding what lies within it. I am honored to join the motivated and interdisciplinary Gates Cambridge community.

Previous Education

University of Delaware Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences 2019

 

Alumni Association

All Scholars automatically become members of the Gates Cambridge Alumni Association (GCAA) at the end of their award.  The GCAA Board (whose work is funded by the Trust) aims to build a global network of alumni dedicated to improving the lives of others, to promote the Gates Cambridge Scholarship and to engage alumni through the exchange of knowledge, academic ideas and professional development.

You can find out more information on the Alumni page.

Arrival & settling in

Arrival

For information about getting to Cambridge from your arrival point in the UK the Visit Cambridge website.

To get your bearings once in Cambridge see the University’s map of Cambridge.

New Scholar Induction & Orientation

During the week before term starts, you will join Gates Cambridge’s one day Induction programme in Cambridge and a four-day Orientation in the Peak District. Both are fully funded by the Trust and delivered by the Scholars’ Council. New Scholars have consistently reported that Orientation was a highlight of the entire year and that the friendships they made lasted through the rest of the year. All Scholars are expected to attend Induction and Orientation is highly recommended. However, if you are not able to attend you should let the Scholars’ Council know and they will ensure you are provided with key information from Induction. The Scholars Council will send details of Induction and Orientation to new Scholars by email at the relevant time.

NOTE: if attending Orientation you should contact your College to arrange for your accommodation to be available earlier than normal.

An induction for Scholar’s family members will take place at the same time as the induction for Scholars. Information is shared via email prior to your arrival in Cambridge.

Welcome dinner

In late September, shortly after Scholars return from Orientation, the Trust holds a formal dinner to welcome the new class of Scholars. The Trust will send out details well in advance.

Settling in

Your first few weeks in Cambridge will be busy and may feel a little disorienting, but there are a range of activities and support mechanisms to help you settle in to life here.

The beginning of Michaelmas Term in Cambridge is often extremely busy as thousands of new students arrive, Colleges hold various events, societies and sports teams gear up, and degrees, classes, and courses get into full swing. You may feel overwhelmed and worry that you’ll never have any time to get work done—don’t worry, this is a very common feeling in these early days — relax and enjoy it. The University calendar does settle down considerably after October.

Funding your first week in Cambridge

The maintenance allowance will be paid to Scholars during the first week of term and it is hoped that the majority of new Scholars will be able to support themselves until funds are available in their bank accounts.

Advance funding of up to £100 will be made available to any Scholars who have no other funds with which to sustain themselves between arrival in Cambridge and maintenance cheque distribution. Application for and collection of advance funding can be arranged by emailing scholar.support@gatescambridge.org but as previously stated, the Trust will only consider applications where no other personal funds are available. Please note that your first term of maintenance allowance will be reduced by the amount of advance funding you receive.

College accommodation deposit

Some Colleges request a deposit, payable before your arrival in Cambridge, to guarantee your accommodation. The Trust is not able to pay this deposit on your behalf. However, if you let your College Accommodation Officer know you are a Gates Cambridge Scholar they may be able to add the deposit onto your first College bill which is usually due for payment after you have received your first maintenance grant from the Trust. However, please note the Trust has no authority in this area and some Colleges may still require an advance payment.

University and College events & information

You can find full details about advice and activities for new students on the Cambridge Students website and through your College website and Porter’s Lodge.

Finances

Budgeting

The Gates Cambridge Scholarship is very generous and compares favourably against other major funding in the UK. But it is important that you budget properly during your time at Cambridge to ensure you get the most out of your experience – and avoid financial difficulties.

The Trust and Scholars’ Council have worked together to created a budgeting guide, which we strongly recommend you read.

Core  funding

Your Gates Cambridge Scholarship includes the following core components:

  • Tuition Fee
  • Maintenance allowance (£17,500 for 12 months at the 2020–21 rate; pro rata for courses shorter than 12 months)
  • One economy single airfare at both the beginning and end of your course (or a return ticket for courses shorter than 11 months)
  • Visa costs, which also include the annual  Immigration Health Surcharge for the tenure of your visa

Tuition Fee

The University Composition Fee is the approved tuition fee for the degree and subject you will undertake at Cambridge. The University Composition Fee is paid directly to your College which forwards it on to the University. The Trust expects this fee to cover all of the costs related to your course within your department (e.g. Supervisor, fieldwork costs, equipment, departmental administrative support, lab space etc.).

Please note: the University Composition Fee also covers your College membership fee but it does not cover your accommodation, meals and similar – you will need to pay for these using your maintenance allowance.

The University Composition Fee is paid by the Trust directly to your College each year. You do not need to be involved with this process; your College is aware of your status as a Gates Cambridge Scholar and should not contact you for payment.

Maintenance Allowance

Maintenance payments are made at the start of each academic quarter (October, January, April and – if appropriate – July) and your first payment will be made by cheque. You will be contacted by the Programme team via e-mail with regards to collection times and location.

From the second instalment onwards you have the option of receiving your maintenance allowance via a direct transfer to your bank account. You will be required to sign-in in person at the Trust’s Offices at the end of each quarter. See below the sign-in dates for the academic year 2019-20:

  • Lent Term – Monday 2 December 2019 to Wednesday 11 December 2019
  • Easter Term – Monday 9 March 2020 to Thursday 19 March 2020
  • Long Vacation – Monday 8 June 2020 to Thursday 18 June 2020

Please note that the Trust cannot change the dates on which payments of allowances are normally made, unless there are exceptional circumstances.

Fourth year maintenance (PhD Scholars)

If you require maintenance during some or all of the fourth year of your PhD you may request this in the third year of your award by completing the Fourth Year Funding form. Full instructions and deadlines and are available on the first page of the form.

Visa costs

Your scholarship includes the cost of a visa, should you require one, at the standard rate (including the Immigration Health Surcharge).  Full details are available on the Scholar-elect page.

Travel home

As part of your scholarship you are eligible for a single economy airfare from the UK to your normal place of residence (home).

The form to apply for your airfare home will be available shortly.  We are currently updating our travel booking process following the announcement that our travel agent, STA Travel Cambridge, has ceased trading.  In the meantime, if you urgently need to book a flight home, please contact the Programme Team

If at the end of your course you are leaving Cambridge but not going to your normal place of residence (home), we will cover whichever is the cheapest fare of the two.

We expect that flights ‘home’ to be scheduled close to your official leaving time – i.e. if you finish your Scholarship in September but decide to stay in the UK until Christmas, we expect to receive an itinerary for September and not for Christmas (which has inflated holiday prices). Scholars who choose to travel at peak holiday times, or who do not plan ahead, may be asked to pay the difference between a standard, economy airfare and the peak time inflated price.

Discretionary Funding

Overview

Scholars may apply for the discretionary funding listed below which is in addition to the core funding set out in the formal offer letter and which requires an application to be submitted.

  • Academic development funding to attend activities such as conferences and courses related to your studies
  • Family allowance (for children, not partners) should you bring your family with you to Cambridge
  • Maternity/Paternity funding – should you or your partner become pregnant during your time at Cambridge
  • Hardship funding – for unforeseen difficulties

Full details on each type of discretionary funding is provided below, including application forms.

When considering applying for any discretionary funding, firstly please investigate what funding is available.  You must apply to all sources of funding that are available to you – usually your Department and College and in some cases the Student Registry, University societies or external sources.  You should not assume the Trust is the first or only port of call for additional funding.

If any discretionary funding granted from the Trust is unspent you must return this to the Trust.  Please ensure you apply in good time. The Trust does not consider retrospective applications.

The Trust’s policies on additional funding will be reviewed regularly and the Trust reserves the right to amend or alter its policies at any time. The Trust reviews applications for discretionary funding on a case-by-case basis and retains final discretion over whether funding is awarded.

What the Trust does not fund

The Trust will not consider applications for:

  • fieldwork related costs
  • private medical treatment
  • internships
  • purchasing course or conference related items such as posters, textbooks, lab materials or laptops
  • thesis printing & binding (all scholars have a printing allowance usable in the Scholars Common Room)

The above costs should either be covered by the course fees paid on your behalf, or purchased from your maintenance allowance.

 

Academic Development Funding

Academic Development funding is intended to support activities such as attendance at conferences or courses related to your studies, which are additional to those that should be covered by the University fee paid by the Trust. Any application which funds a key component of your course will not be considered as these should be covered by the fees paid by the Trust to the University on your behalf.

Academic Development funding is offered at the following rates:

  • One-year degree: up to £500
  • Two-year degree: up to £1,250
  • Three-year degree or longer: up to £2,000

Please note that (a) you can only apply for a maximum of £500 in the probationary first year of your PhD and (b) the above are not allowances, but the maximum amounts you may apply for.

Funding can be applied for one or more times during the formal tenure of your course. For PhD students: Academic Development activities may not be applied for during a period of writing up (4th year), however you may attend an activity during your period of writing up if you apply to attend and register for the event whilst in your third year.

When applying for funding you will need to include a statement of support from your Supervisor or course tutor as part of the application form. There is no limit to the number of applications for Academic Development funding you can make, however the Trust will only fund activities that are undertaken while you are a student (i.e. before your course end date) and relevant to your course. The Trust retains final discretion over whether an activity will be supported.

You may not use Academic Development funds to purchase physical items (e.g. posters, books, laptops, cameras etc.).  Funds can also not be used to pay for unofficial suppliers/unregulated suppliers such as a friend providing you with accommodation during a conference, Air B&B bookings or transport provided by unregulated providers such as a friend driving you or Uber.

You should apply for Academic Development Funding at least a month in advance of the event and where possible, provide supporting documentation to evidence the expected costs.

Apply for Academic Development Funding

 

Family Allowance

If you wish to bring dependants (e.g. your spouse and/or children) with you to Cambridge you will need to obtain prior permission from the Graduate Admissions Office and will be asked to prove you can cover their costs.

You can also apply to the Trust to help with the cost of supporting your child/children with you in Cambridge through the Family Allowance Fund. The Trust provides Family Allowance at the following rates:

  • First child: £10,420, per annum
  • Second child: £4,450 per annum

These payments are significantly more generous than the University’s suggested funding guidelines for families and will therefore allow you to meet your financial offer condition with your total income. They are also maximum allowances and based on Scholars and their child/children residing in Cambridge. Scholars who go on fieldwork/LTWA or decide to write up their PhD thesis outside Cambridge with their children should contact the Trust about their plans well in advance; such applications are considered on a case by case basis and if awarded, different rates from the above may apply. The Trust reviews applications for all discretionary funding on a case by case basis and retains final discretion over whether funding is awarded.

Please note that the Trust does not provide any financial support for partners.

Apply for Family Allowance

 

Maternity/paternity Allowance

If you or your partner become pregnant during your time at Cambridge you may apply to the University formally to intermit your studies on non-medical grounds – see Intermission for Graduate students for full details.

If you are granted intermission by the University for maternity/paternity leave you may also apply to the Trust for a Maternity/Paternity Allowance. If this allowance is granted the Trust will continue to pay your maintenance allowance at the appropriate* rate for up to 2 quarters and will “suspend” your Scholarship until you return to your studies and extend your award finish date to reflect the Maternity/Paternity leave taken.

*Maternity/Paternity payments are made quarterly at the Trust’s standard maintenance rate if the Scholar and their partner remain in residence in Cambridge during the period of intermission.  In some cases the Trust may adjust the payment rate (e.g. if the Scholar and their partner reside outside Cambridge during the period of intermission). The Trust reviews applications for all discretionary funding on a case by case basis and retains final discretion over whether funding is awarded.

Please note: if you are a Tier 4 sponsored student intermitting your studies may have implications for your visa status. The Trust has been advised by the University’s International Student Team that Tier 4 visa holders can intermit for up to 4 months without affecting their existing visa; intermitting beyond 4 months will likely invalidate your current visa (in such circumstances the Trust will not cover the cost of a new visa).  For full, up to date information you are strongly advised to read the Student Registry’s web page regarding Intermission for Graduate students.

If you are on a one or two year programme of study there may be restrictions to the number of terms of intermission that can be applied for.

You are advised to first contact the Student Registry to ask for advice on intermitting for the purposes of maternity/paternity leave before completing this application form. The Trust will follow the University’s Maternity/Paternity policy.

Apply for Maternity/Paternity Funding

 

Fieldwork and Leave to Work Away

Applications for Fieldwork Funding are considered by Schools or departments. For further information please read the Student Registry’s web page for Graduate Students.

The Trust will continue to pay your fees whilst you are away on fieldwork so you are not eligible to apply to the Trust for additional fieldwork funding. However, you may apply to the Trust to continue to receive maintenance during your period of fieldwork (although this may be reduced if cost of living is significantly lower where your leave takes place or you will be receiving another source of income). In addition to the application for fieldwork to the University, you must also make an application to the Trust to seek permission to (a) leave Cambridge for the purpose of fieldwork and (b) to retain your maintenance allowance while away from Cambridge – this must include strong support from your Supervisor. The Trust will only provide the additional fieldwork funding above (i.e. fees and potentially maintenance) if you gain permission from the Student Registry for Leave to Work Away (LTWA). You should make all of the necessary advance arrangements for fieldwork in advance, including taking our travel insurance with the University.

You should apply to the University to work away 2-3 months before you plan to leave Cambridge, to allow time for your application to be reviewed. You should apply to the Trust for continued funding at a similar time and at least 6 weeks in advance of your planned departure date. The Trust reviews applications for all discretionary funding on a case by case basis and retains final discretion over whether funding is awarded.

Inform the Trust about your Leave to Work Away plans

 

Hardship

In the event that you should require additional funding for an unexpected or emergency situation, you should submit an application to the Hardship Fund. These applications are dealt with sympathetically and on a case by case basis.

Please note: the Trust is unable to provide funding for private medical treatment as all Scholars are covered for National Health Service treatment through the Immigration Health Surcharge already paid on your behalf by the Trust during your visa application process.

The Trust reviews all applications for discretionary funding on a case-by-case basis and retains final discretion over whether funding is awarded.

Apply for Hardship Funding

 

 

Policies & regulations

Academic Progress

First and foremost, the Trust expects Scholars to fully dedicate themselves to their study and research while at Cambridge so as to successfully complete their degrees. As a Gates Cambridge Scholar, you have been nominated by your Cambridge department as one of their very best applicants to the University.

Your Supervisor/Course Director must complete a termly report about your academic progress for the University via CamSIS, the University’s student system. You can access these reports via your CamSIS self-service page and should read them.

In addition Scholars and their Supervisors must complete the Gates Cambridge annual report form during Easter Term each year. This is an on-line form completed by you and your Supervisor and used to track the progress of our Scholars. You will not receive your next quarterly maintenance payment until your annual report has been received. If your annual report suggests there is a cause for concern the Trust arrange for you and your Supervisor to submit quarterly progress reports. While your progress is under review, maintenance payments will only be issued where there is a demonstration of improved performance.

Residing in Cambridge

A founding purpose of Gates Cambridge Scholarships is to give you the opportunity to study in Cambridge and to be part of the Gates Cambridge community. Although the University does allow you to spend time away from Cambridge, the Trust does not look favourably upon extended periods of working away and our expectation is that Scholars will reside in Cambridge for the duration of their studies unless they have been given permission by the University and the Trust for any Leave To Work Away (e.g. for required fieldwork) or Intermission (e.g. for medical or compassionate reasons). You can find more information about residence on the University’s website.

Know the University Regulations

You must be aware of the regulations of the University and your College. It is a condition of the Gates Cambridge Scholarships that these regulations are observed. Due to the University’s federated nature you must not rely on one body (e.g. the Student Registry) to inform all other bodies (e.g. the Trust, your College, your Department) about any changes to your circumstances, so make sure you tell all relevant bodies, including the Trust. University policies may change throughout the year; it is your responsibility to be aware of them but the Trust will update you on these changes when it directly impacts upon our policies.

Code of Practice

Be sure to read the University’s Code of Practice for Graduate Students and Supervisors, which is issued and updated annually by the University and explains the role and obligations of Supervisors and Graduate Students. The Trust will send you a copy in October.

Receiving a salary or substantial other scholarship?

 

Gates Cambridge Scholarships are fully funded and we do not expect you to hold any other named Scholarships coincident with your Gates Cambridge funding. An exception to this is made for Scholars in receipt UK Research Council fees awards or the NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program scholarship (at Gates Cambridge maintenance rates while in Cambridge).

If you will receive a salary from your employer, or receive substantial funding from any other source during the tenure of your Gates Cambridge Scholarship, the Trust must be informed of this. In such circumstances it is likely that your award will be reduced to take account of substantial external income. For example, a Scholar in receipt of a salary which is equivalent to or more than the Trust’s maintenance allowance during their award will receive a fees only award.

The Trust will not normally reduce its levels of funding to Scholars who have won modest awards.

Tax and your Scholarship

Gates Cambridge Scholarships are not taxable in the UK. The Trust is unable to provide further tax guidance and Scholars should seek independent tax advice as to the tax status of the scholarship in their home country.

The University of Cambridge does not currently complete 1098T tax forms for US students as foreign universities are not obliged to provide this information.

If you require a letter from our Finance team to confirm your Gates Cambridge award or the funding you have received, please email scholar.support@gatescambridge.org

 

Illness

The Trust will always deal as sympathetically as possible with problems arising from illness and you may apply to the hardship fund if you are in financial difficulty. However, your College should be the first port of call in these cases as they are responsible for your pastoral care. If you develop a physical or other ailment while in Cambridge which might seriously impede academic progress, you must discuss your situation with your College Tutor and contact the Trust.

You should raise any illness-related issue that may impact your ability to complete your course with your College Tutor (initially, as well as others where appropriate) as soon as possible – this allows appropriate support to be sign-posted and offered in good time.

If you have an illness which prevents you from undertaking your studies/research you should discuss intermitting your studies with your supervisor and Graduate Tutor – and let the Trust know about these discussions.

 

Debt

Please note that the Trust disclaims all responsibility for any debts you may incur. Nor will the Trust act as guarantor for loans or debts. Scholars are advised that the Trust reserves the right to pay maintenance to the college if so requested on the reasonable grounds of failure to settle outstanding debts to the College or any other body.

Intermission (taking a break from your course)

Intermission has a formal meaning and requires a change in your registered status at the University. It does not mean to informally ‘take a break’.  You can find full details on the University’s web page.

Should you need to ‘intermit’ your studies (i.e. you need to stop your research or course attendance) for medical or non-medical reasons you apply to the Student Registry for permission to intermit and also complete the Trust’s Intermission application form below.  PhD students should always discuss any plans to intermit well in advance with their supervisor, College Tutor or Departmental Graduate advisor/administrator.

Once your application for intermission has been approved by the Student Registry and the Trust your Scholarship will be ‘suspended’ – the Trust will not be liable for University fees and you will not receive your maintenance allowance. Your Scholarship will restart when you return to Cambridge and your award finish date will be amended to reflect the period of Intermission. Scholars on a Tier 4 visa should note that the Trust is only able to suspend its award, it has no control over visa extensions. Scholars can find more details on Tier 4 visa and intermitting on the University’s web page.

A retrospective application for Intermission will not be accepted unless there have been exceptional circumstances and you may be required to return any maintenance you have already received.

Where a Scholar has to intermit for circumstances beyond their control (e.g. illness) and is unable to return to their home country for the period of intermission, the Trust will consider an application for hardship funding.

De-registration

In very rare circumstances, de-registration from the list of graduate students may occur if a Scholar fails to perform academically at the standard expected by their Department, or breaches one of the University’s regulations.  More information is available from the University’s web pages.

The Trust would hope that no Gates Cambridge Scholar should become deregistered by the University. Any Scholar who is experiencing difficulties whilst at Cambridge should inform the Trust as soon as possible and well in advance of any action being taken.

In the event that a Scholar is de-registered they will retain the right to appeal under University regulations. There is no guarantee however that the Trust will support such an appeal, and it is unlikely that a Scholar will be funded by the Trust throughout the appeal process.  Should a Scholar be found to have been guilty of a serious breach of University regulations (such as undertaking full time paid employment whilst enrolled as a PhD student), then the Trust may seek to recover any maintenance and fees paid during the period of the breach.

 

Data Protection & Privacy

The Trust is committed to protecting your data and giving you full control of it.

You can find out more by reading our Privacy policy and Data Protection Statement.

Intellectual Property

The Trust places no condition on ownership of any intellectual property for its scholars, past or present.

If it is appropriate to do so, you are very welcome to acknowledge the support you have received from the Trust to undertake your studies/project/paper etc. You are welcome to use the Gates Cambridge logo and template PowerPoint presentation. Please email scholar.support@gatescambridge.org for these files.

Events & activities

Being a student at the University of Cambridge presents you with many opportunities for academic development alongside social and cultural activities.

In addition to University and College events, the Gates Cambridge community hosts a wide range of events to enable its diverse members to form a strong and vibrant community at and beyond Cambridge. Information about all events and opportunities are sent out via the weekly e-Bulletin (which is the best way to become acquainted with the Gates Cambridge community) and Scholars should subscribe to the Gates Cambridge Calendar for up-to-date information on all events. You can find a summary below:

Induction and Orientation (New Scholars only)

See Arrival and settling in above.

Welcome Dinner (New Scholars only)

After the Orientation, the Welcome Dinner is the first Trust event you will be invited to and usually takes place at the end of September, just before the start of term. It is a formal dinner hosted by the Provost. Beginning with a drinks reception, the dinner is an opportunity to get to know your fellow Scholars and to meet the Trust’s staff.

Annual lecture

At this Trust organised event, an eminent speaker is invited to talk to the Gates Cambridge community and wider University on a topic of importance and current interest.

Scholars’ Council events 

In addition to the many smaller events run throughout the year by the Scholars Council, there are “flagship” events for the entire Gates Cambridge community. These include:

  • Gates Gala – this occurs in November each year and is the flagship event of Michaelmas Term. Gala is a ‘black tie’ evening and an opportunity for all current Scholars, families, alumni, members of the Trust, and their guests to converge for an evening of music, dancing, entertainment, and more.
  • Day of Engagement – usually held in Lent Term and an opportunity for Scholars to utilize the traits we were selected for (outstanding intellectual ability and leadership potential) to act on our commitment to improving the lives of others.
  • Day of Research – usually held in Easter Term, this has two primary aims: to showcase the research undertaken by members of the Gates community and to provide Scholars with the opportunity to gain experience in presenting their work.
  • The Garden Party – this is a charity event, during which Gates Scholars raise money for a specified charity or trust while additionally enjoying an afternoon of music, food, and beverages. The Garden Party is typically held outside and occurs during May Week.
  • In addition to the major events listed above, the Scholars Council and Scholar community organise a wide range of interesting and engaging activities throughout the year. These include social events (pub nights, potlucks, term trips, etc.), academic events (discussion groups, external speakers at Gates Conversations, and internal symposia at which Scholars share their work with one another), cultural events (e.g. trips to cultural and historic sites in the UK) and the many personal and professional development events under the Learning for Purpose programme.

Learning for Purpose

Learning for Purpose (LfP) is a unique component of the Gates Cambridge Scholarship with a focus on practical skill building through tailored learning. The programme seeks to support and equip Scholars in their personal and professional development as researchers and potential leaders striving to make a positive difference in the lives of others. LfP facilitates opportunities for Scholars to explore and reflect on questions pertaining to leadership, with the aim of fostering mindful leaders. LfP organises bespoke workshops by world experts and encourages peer-to-peer and informal learning through discussion panels and events amongst current Scholars. One critical outcome of LfP trainings is a set of transferable skills for each Scholar, which can be used across academic disciplines.

Visit the LfP website.

Graduation Dinner

The Graduation Dinner is a formal farewell to graduating Scholars. Held in summer, it is an opportunity to celebrate your hard work and achievements in the company of your peers, the Trustees and Trust staff. This event also acts as your official welcome to the Gates Cambridge Alumni community.

 

Networking & resources

Member Directory

 

You can look up any member of the Gates Cambridge community using the public Directory. You can then search the Internet for further details.

Your on-line profile

Every scholar-elect, scholar and alumna/nus has an on-line profile which allows you to update certain elements (e.g. contact, location and employment details). This is currently not searchable by members, but is a very useful tool for the Trust to report on the community and to send members appropriate information about events and activities.

@gatesscholar.org email

Your profile comes with the ability to use a forwarding email address of username@gatesscholar.org. This is not a comprehensive email system, simply a forwarding function. If you know your username (e.g. j.bloggs) you can test the forwarding function by sending an email to j.bloggs@gatesscholar.org. If you do not know your username you can either log in to your profile or email scholar.support@gatescambridge.org.

Social media

 

There are numerous social media channels, pages and groups which are available to members.

Public channels

Member only groups

  • Scholars-elect Facebook group (private, managed by the Scholars Council) – the Scholars’ Council send a link to all Scholars-elect
  • Scholars Facebook group (private, managed by the Scholars Council) – the Scholars’ Council send a link to all Scholars
  • Alumni Facebook group (private, managed by the Alumni Association) – details sent to Scholars about to graduate
  • LinkedIn group (private, managed by the Trust) – search for “Gates Cambridge Scholars, Past and Present”

Logos and PowerPoint

You are welcome to use the Gates Cambridge logo and template PowerPoint presentation. Please email scholar.support@gatescambridge.org requesting these files.

Open Access Publishing 

The University states that “All research active staff and students publishing journal articles or conference proceedings should upload their accepted manuscripts to www.openaccess.cam.ac.uk immediately after acceptance for publication.”

The Gates Foundation states: “If the publication is a direct result of research conducted while a Gates Cambridge Trust affiliate, we will cover the open access publishing fees. The publication does need to be compliant with the Open Access policy – articles must be open access, immediately available, and published with a CC-BY license. The foundation has released Chronos, our new publishing service, which manages the whole publishing process, including invoice payment. Click here to watch an introduction video to Chronos. All future manuscripts will be submitted through Chronos. Already submitted manuscripts or invoices can be emailed to the Chronos Support team for processing. Access to the system can be requested from the Chronos homepage. We link all publications to a specific Gates grant number that funded the work. In this case the grant number would be for the original endowment OPP1144.” For any questions please contact Ashley Farley, Associate Officer – Open Access Team – Knowledge and Research Services, openaccess@gatesfoundation.org, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. You can also review the Foundation’s Open Access Policy & FAQ’s.

Gates Scholars Common Room (GSCR)

Whilst in Cambridge you will have access to the Gates Scholars Common Room (GSCR). This room is located on the 2nd floor of the University Centre. It is there for you to work in, relax in, and to mix with fellow Gates Cambridge Scholars and is the location for a lot of Scholars’ Council organised events. Resources include a computer lab, a collection of books from the Cambridge University Press, space to read and work, Wi-Fi, a TV room, games, etc.

The room is accessible to all Scholars and Alumni with your university card. If you have any trouble accessing the Common Room with your University card, please contact the Internal Officer of the Scholars’ Council (internal@gatescouncil.org).  The University Centre is open seven days a week from 9.00am to 11.00pm (10.30pm on Sunday).

Printing allowance

Each year the Trust provides a printing allowance (currently £20 per annum) to all Scholars in residence which can be used on the printers in the Scholars’ Room. Unused credit does not roll over and it is not normally possible to provide additional credit.

In addition, many Scholars will have access to free or discounted printing via their College and/or department.

Outreach and promotion

Outreach

Scholars and Alumni can undertake outreach via the Ambassador Programme – a Scholar and Alumni-led and Trust-supported project to increase awareness about the Gates Cambridge Scholarships across the world.

Scholars and Alumni arrange formal presentations or informal conversations at their local universities or other institutions – e.g. as part of a trip for a conference, fieldwork or holiday – or when they return home after their scholarship. There is no application process or formal arrangements, but you can find more information and resources on the Be an Ambassador page.

Promotion

There are two main ways you can help promote the Gates Cambridge Scholarship programme and the opportunities it offers:

  • Create content – whether writing for The Scholar magazine, creating a blog or interviewing for a profile you can make your own contribution to profile raising.

Send us news

Knowing about the successes and activities of our Scholars and Alumni is key to showcasing the Gates Cambridge programme to the wider world and to our community. A good stream of news allows us to do this – as well as increasing an individual Scholar’s profile.

Will you or a Scholar you know:

  • be a recipient of an award

  • publish a book or paper

  • take part in a significant international event

  • organise a conference or similar event

  • set up or play a significant new role in an NGO or other body

  • write an op-ed

  • about to be receive some media coverage

  • or undertake something else we could promote

If so, send details to news@gatescambridge.org. If you can send details before the event all the better, but if you can only send details post event please do.

Create content

There are lots opportunities to create content. Find out what you can do for Gates Cambridge and how we can help you.

  • Interview for a profile [links to pdf]

  • Blog for us [links to pdf]

  • Write an article for The Scholar magazine [links to pdf]

  • Press releases and media contacts [links to pdf]

Please email news@gatescambridge.org with details.

Help, support & well-being

Whether you are a new Scholar arriving from overseas (for whom Cambridge may seem bewildering) or a current Scholar facing challenges, there are a range of options for help, support and well-being while you are a student at Cambridge.

Your College

Your College is responsible for your pastoral support and welfare while at Cambridge and is your first port of call for almost any difficulties you may be experiencing.  Each College has a dedicated College Tutor responsible for the welfare of its students; your College should provide details during College orientation. College MCR Welfare Officers can be contacted for advice, especially if you want to understand the options available before raising a formal issue with College Tutorial staff.

Your Department

Your Department is responsible for providing your education, progress and a academic support at Cambridge. You should contact the relevant person with any questions or concerns relating to your course, supervisor or Department. For general or administrative enquiries you may want to start with the Graduate Administrator of your Department; for specific questions or concerns relating to your course or research you should contact your Primary Supervisor (PhD Scholars) or Course Director (Masters degree Scholars).

The Trust

You should contact us with any questions or concerns related to your scholarship. In addition, you should contact the Trust if for any of the reasons listed in the section entitled “When to contact the Trust”. The Scholar Support team (currently made up of the Programme Manager and Progamme Officer) should be your first point of contact and you can contact them on scholar.support@gatescambridge.org.

The Scholars’ Council

The Scholars’ Council can provide information on anything related to activities and events organised them and the Scholars’ Room.

University services

The University offers a range of specific support and well-being services (from the Disability Resource Centre and Counselling Service to the Careers Service and Childcare Office) and you can find full details on the University’s well-being portal

Contact

How we contact you

The Trust and Scholars Council will always communicate with you via email. Make sure you check your email regularly and if you use spam-filters add Gates Cambridge related email addresses to your address book (@gatescambridge.org and @gatescouncil.org domains).

The Trust expects Scholars to respond to requests for information and complete any surveys which are sent out so that it can assess the success of the programme on an on-going basis.

Letters and cheques (apart from maintenance) will be sent to your College pigeon-hole. It is your responsibility to check your College mail regularly.

 

How and when to can contact the Trust

The Trust’s staff are here to support and help you before, during and after your time at Cambridge.

You can contact the Scholar Support team at any point by email on scholar.support@gatescambridge.org.

The Trust needs to know about your academic progress and plans and any major changes to your circumstances at Cambridge. Please contact the Trust as soon as possible in any of the following circumstances:

  • You are thinking about applying for Leave To Work Away – e.g. for fieldwork
  • You are thinking about applying for Intermission (a break from your course) – e.g. for medical reasons
  • You are experiencing financial, medical, personal, mental health or other difficulties that are impacting on your ability to successfully complete your course on time/at all
  • You are thinking about changing your supervisor
  • You are thinking about changing your course
  • Any other circumstances that might affect your ability to make satisfactory academic progress

Please do not ignore any concerns or difficulties you may be experiencing. It is always the case that the sooner you inform the Trust of any important changes or difficulties you are experiencing the sooner we can help or signpost you to help in other parts of the Collegiate University. The Trust will always deal with all inquiries confidentially and is available to discuss any relevant issues with you.